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In vitro availability of starch in heat-treated potatoes as related to genotype, weight and storage time

Leeman, Margareta LU ; Bårström, L Mattias and Björck, Inger LU (2005) In Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture 85(5). p.751-756
Abstract
The objective of the study was to determine the influence of potato variety, weight and storage time after lifting on the glycaemic index (GI) and resistant starch (RS) content predicted from measurement of the rate and extent of in vitro starch hydrolysis, respectively. The potatoes were either boiled, or boiled and subjected to different heat-cycling conditions selected to promote retrogradation of amylose or amylopectin, respectively. The hydrolysis indices (HI) and predicted GIs of all 19 potato products were high and fell within narrow ranges of 122-144 and 118-138, respectively. No correlation between average weight of the potato tuber and HI was found. Furthermore, there was no difference in HI between potatoes stored for 1-3 or... (More)
The objective of the study was to determine the influence of potato variety, weight and storage time after lifting on the glycaemic index (GI) and resistant starch (RS) content predicted from measurement of the rate and extent of in vitro starch hydrolysis, respectively. The potatoes were either boiled, or boiled and subjected to different heat-cycling conditions selected to promote retrogradation of amylose or amylopectin, respectively. The hydrolysis indices (HI) and predicted GIs of all 19 potato products were high and fell within narrow ranges of 122-144 and 118-138, respectively. No correlation between average weight of the potato tuber and HI was found. Furthermore, there was no difference in HI between potatoes stored for 1-3 or 8-10 months, nor between varieties of new potato and winter potato. However, the HI was significantly lowered by temperature cycling at conditions known to promote retrogradation of amylopectin (6 degrees C, 48 h) compared with 6 degrees C for 24 h followed by 70 degrees C for 24 h. RS content was already substantial in boiled potatoes, 4.5 g 100 g(-1) (starch basis), and could be increased further by temperature cycling, the highest yield obtained, 9.8 g 100 g(-1) (starch basis), following heat treatment at 6 degrees C for 24 h followed by 70 degrees C for 24 h; that is at conditions known to favour amylose retrogradation. (c) 2004 Society of Chemical Industry. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture
volume
85
issue
5
pages
751 - 756
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • wos:000227690600005
  • scopus:15544378311
ISSN
1097-0010
DOI
10.1002/jsfa.2035
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
a8a098c3-e147-4e17-ba83-096a983be33a (old id 151370)
date added to LUP
2007-07-18 09:19:09
date last changed
2017-07-16 03:55:16
@article{a8a098c3-e147-4e17-ba83-096a983be33a,
  abstract     = {The objective of the study was to determine the influence of potato variety, weight and storage time after lifting on the glycaemic index (GI) and resistant starch (RS) content predicted from measurement of the rate and extent of in vitro starch hydrolysis, respectively. The potatoes were either boiled, or boiled and subjected to different heat-cycling conditions selected to promote retrogradation of amylose or amylopectin, respectively. The hydrolysis indices (HI) and predicted GIs of all 19 potato products were high and fell within narrow ranges of 122-144 and 118-138, respectively. No correlation between average weight of the potato tuber and HI was found. Furthermore, there was no difference in HI between potatoes stored for 1-3 or 8-10 months, nor between varieties of new potato and winter potato. However, the HI was significantly lowered by temperature cycling at conditions known to promote retrogradation of amylopectin (6 degrees C, 48 h) compared with 6 degrees C for 24 h followed by 70 degrees C for 24 h. RS content was already substantial in boiled potatoes, 4.5 g 100 g(-1) (starch basis), and could be increased further by temperature cycling, the highest yield obtained, 9.8 g 100 g(-1) (starch basis), following heat treatment at 6 degrees C for 24 h followed by 70 degrees C for 24 h; that is at conditions known to favour amylose retrogradation. (c) 2004 Society of Chemical Industry.},
  author       = {Leeman, Margareta and Bårström, L Mattias and Björck, Inger},
  issn         = {1097-0010},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {751--756},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture},
  title        = {In vitro availability of starch in heat-treated potatoes as related to genotype, weight and storage time},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jsfa.2035},
  volume       = {85},
  year         = {2005},
}