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Liver and gallbladder cancer in immigrants to Sweden.

Hemminki, Kari LU ; Mousavi, Seyed Mohsen; Brandt, Andreas; Ji, Jianguang LU and Sundquist, Jan LU (2010) In European Journal of Cancer 46. p.926-931
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The changes of cancer incidence upon immigration can be used as an estimator of environmental influence on cancer risk. We studied site-specific liver and biliary cancers in first-generation immigrants to Sweden with an aim to search for aetiological clues and to find evidence for indigenous incidence rates. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We used the nation-wide Swedish Family-Cancer Database to calculate standardised incidence ratios (SIRs) in immigrants compared to native Swedes. RESULTS: A total of 1428 cancers were identified in immigrants whose median ages (years) at immigration were 27 for men and 26 for women and whose median diagnostic ages were 64 and 66, respectively. The highest SIRs of 6.7 for primary liver cancer were... (More)
BACKGROUND: The changes of cancer incidence upon immigration can be used as an estimator of environmental influence on cancer risk. We studied site-specific liver and biliary cancers in first-generation immigrants to Sweden with an aim to search for aetiological clues and to find evidence for indigenous incidence rates. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We used the nation-wide Swedish Family-Cancer Database to calculate standardised incidence ratios (SIRs) in immigrants compared to native Swedes. RESULTS: A total of 1428 cancers were identified in immigrants whose median ages (years) at immigration were 27 for men and 26 for women and whose median diagnostic ages were 64 and 66, respectively. The highest SIRs of 6.7 for primary liver cancer were observed for men from East Asia and sub-Saharan Africa. Increased SIRs were recorded for male immigrants from previous Yugoslavia (1.78), Southern Europe (2.91), Turkey (2.15) and Asian Arab countries (2.89). For gallbladder cancer, only women from the Indian subcontinent (3.84) and Chile (2.34) had increased risk while some Northern European immigrants showed decreased risks. CONCLUSIONS: Primary liver cancer was increased in immigrants from endemic regions of hepatitis B virus infection but also from large regions lacking cancer incidence data, North Africa, Asian Arab countries, Turkey and previous Yugoslavia; these are probably intermediary risk regions for this infection. The consideration of these regions as risk areas would justify active diagnostic and vaccination programs. The increase in gallbladder cancer in Chileans and Indians suggests that some persistent damage was inflicted before emigration, characterisation of which will be a challenge for aetiological studies. (Less)
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author
organization
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type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
European Journal of Cancer
volume
46
pages
926 - 931
publisher
IFAC & Elsevier Ltd.
external identifiers
  • wos:000276755800020
  • pmid:20064704
  • scopus:77349092850
ISSN
1879-0852
DOI
10.1016/j.ejca.2009.12.031
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
9b904cad-21c2-4512-b694-0d570fdaa661 (old id 1541202)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20064704?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2010-02-02 13:03:37
date last changed
2018-05-29 11:47:05
@article{9b904cad-21c2-4512-b694-0d570fdaa661,
  abstract     = {BACKGROUND: The changes of cancer incidence upon immigration can be used as an estimator of environmental influence on cancer risk. We studied site-specific liver and biliary cancers in first-generation immigrants to Sweden with an aim to search for aetiological clues and to find evidence for indigenous incidence rates. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We used the nation-wide Swedish Family-Cancer Database to calculate standardised incidence ratios (SIRs) in immigrants compared to native Swedes. RESULTS: A total of 1428 cancers were identified in immigrants whose median ages (years) at immigration were 27 for men and 26 for women and whose median diagnostic ages were 64 and 66, respectively. The highest SIRs of 6.7 for primary liver cancer were observed for men from East Asia and sub-Saharan Africa. Increased SIRs were recorded for male immigrants from previous Yugoslavia (1.78), Southern Europe (2.91), Turkey (2.15) and Asian Arab countries (2.89). For gallbladder cancer, only women from the Indian subcontinent (3.84) and Chile (2.34) had increased risk while some Northern European immigrants showed decreased risks. CONCLUSIONS: Primary liver cancer was increased in immigrants from endemic regions of hepatitis B virus infection but also from large regions lacking cancer incidence data, North Africa, Asian Arab countries, Turkey and previous Yugoslavia; these are probably intermediary risk regions for this infection. The consideration of these regions as risk areas would justify active diagnostic and vaccination programs. The increase in gallbladder cancer in Chileans and Indians suggests that some persistent damage was inflicted before emigration, characterisation of which will be a challenge for aetiological studies.},
  author       = {Hemminki, Kari and Mousavi, Seyed Mohsen and Brandt, Andreas and Ji, Jianguang and Sundquist, Jan},
  issn         = {1879-0852},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {926--931},
  publisher    = {IFAC & Elsevier Ltd.},
  series       = {European Journal of Cancer},
  title        = {Liver and gallbladder cancer in immigrants to Sweden.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejca.2009.12.031},
  volume       = {46},
  year         = {2010},
}