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Stem cells in human neurodegenerative disorders--time for clinical translation?

Lindvall, Olle LU and Kokaia, Zaal LU (2010) In Journal of Clinical Investigation 120(1). p.29-40
Abstract
Stem cell-based approaches have received much hype as potential treatments for neurodegenerative disorders. Indeed, transplantation of stem cells or their derivatives in animal models of neurodegenerative diseases can improve function by replacing the lost neurons and glial cells and by mediating remyelination, trophic actions, and modulation of inflammation. Endogenous neural stem cells are also potential therapeutic targets because they produce neurons and glial cells in response to injury and could be affected by the degenerative process. As we discuss here, however, significant hurdles remain before these findings can be responsibly translated to novel therapies. In particular, we need to better understand the mechanisms of action of... (More)
Stem cell-based approaches have received much hype as potential treatments for neurodegenerative disorders. Indeed, transplantation of stem cells or their derivatives in animal models of neurodegenerative diseases can improve function by replacing the lost neurons and glial cells and by mediating remyelination, trophic actions, and modulation of inflammation. Endogenous neural stem cells are also potential therapeutic targets because they produce neurons and glial cells in response to injury and could be affected by the degenerative process. As we discuss here, however, significant hurdles remain before these findings can be responsibly translated to novel therapies. In particular, we need to better understand the mechanisms of action of stem cells after transplantation and learn how to control stem cell proliferation, survival, migration, and differentiation in the pathological environment. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Dopamine: physiology, Neurodegenerative Diseases: therapy, Neurons: cytology, Spinal Cord Injuries: therapy, Parkinson Disease: therapy, Alzheimer Disease: therapy, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: therapy, Stroke: therapy
in
Journal of Clinical Investigation
volume
120
issue
1
pages
29 - 40
publisher
The Journal of Clinical Investigation
external identifiers
  • wos:000273495700006
  • pmid:20051634
  • scopus:74949087489
ISSN
0021-9738
DOI
10.1172/JCI40543
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
01484e87-a6f1-44d1-a58f-fe42195c14de (old id 1541380)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20051634?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2010-02-02 11:52:18
date last changed
2018-07-08 03:39:51
@article{01484e87-a6f1-44d1-a58f-fe42195c14de,
  abstract     = {Stem cell-based approaches have received much hype as potential treatments for neurodegenerative disorders. Indeed, transplantation of stem cells or their derivatives in animal models of neurodegenerative diseases can improve function by replacing the lost neurons and glial cells and by mediating remyelination, trophic actions, and modulation of inflammation. Endogenous neural stem cells are also potential therapeutic targets because they produce neurons and glial cells in response to injury and could be affected by the degenerative process. As we discuss here, however, significant hurdles remain before these findings can be responsibly translated to novel therapies. In particular, we need to better understand the mechanisms of action of stem cells after transplantation and learn how to control stem cell proliferation, survival, migration, and differentiation in the pathological environment.},
  author       = {Lindvall, Olle and Kokaia, Zaal},
  issn         = {0021-9738},
  keyword      = {Dopamine: physiology,Neurodegenerative Diseases: therapy,Neurons: cytology,Spinal Cord Injuries: therapy,Parkinson Disease: therapy,Alzheimer Disease: therapy,Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: therapy,Stroke: therapy},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {29--40},
  publisher    = {The Journal of Clinical Investigation},
  series       = {Journal of Clinical Investigation},
  title        = {Stem cells in human neurodegenerative disorders--time for clinical translation?},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1172/JCI40543},
  volume       = {120},
  year         = {2010},
}