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Age of onset in familial breast cancer as background data for medical surveillance

Brandt, A.; Bermejo, J. Lorenzo; Sundquist, Jan LU and Hemminki, Kari LU (2010) In British Journal of Cancer 102(1). p.42-47
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Familial breast cancers are known to be of early onset. This article provides differences in the age of onset of breast cancer and death by breast cancer between women with and without a family history. METHODS: The Swedish Family-Cancer Database was used to estimate the cumulative risk of breast cancer and death by breast cancer according to family history with a stratified Cox model. Family history was defined separately for affected mother or sister considering their diagnostic ages. RESULTS: The age to reach the same cumulative incidence as women without family history decreased with decreasing diagnostic age of the affected relative. Women with a maternal history reached the risk of women lacking a family history at the... (More)
BACKGROUND: Familial breast cancers are known to be of early onset. This article provides differences in the age of onset of breast cancer and death by breast cancer between women with and without a family history. METHODS: The Swedish Family-Cancer Database was used to estimate the cumulative risk of breast cancer and death by breast cancer according to family history with a stratified Cox model. Family history was defined separately for affected mother or sister considering their diagnostic ages. RESULTS: The age to reach the same cumulative incidence as women without family history decreased with decreasing diagnostic age of the affected relative. Women with a maternal history reached the risk of women lacking a family history at the age of 50 years between 12.3 (mother affected < 40 years) and 3.3 years (mother affected > 82 years) earlier. The trend for breast cancer mortality was essentially similar. CONCLUSIONS: Women with mother or sister affected by breast cancer are diagnosed and die at earlier ages than do women without family history. The differences depend on the diagnostic age of the affected relative. The present data may provide a rationale to derive recommendations for the starting age of screening in women with affected family members. British Journal of Cancer (2010) 102, 42-47. doi:10.1038/sj.bjc.6605421 www.bjcancer.com Published online 10 November 2009 (C) 2010 Cancer Research UK (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
screening, age of onset, breast cancer, familial breast cancer, recommendations, cumulative risk
in
British Journal of Cancer
volume
102
issue
1
pages
42 - 47
publisher
Nature Publishing Group
external identifiers
  • wos:000273563800007
  • scopus:74249085636
ISSN
1532-1827
DOI
10.1038/sj.bjc.6605421
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
99623c86-d6e7-4343-87a2-005d4e67b5bd (old id 1547630)
date added to LUP
2010-02-23 13:32:38
date last changed
2018-05-29 10:22:39
@article{99623c86-d6e7-4343-87a2-005d4e67b5bd,
  abstract     = {BACKGROUND: Familial breast cancers are known to be of early onset. This article provides differences in the age of onset of breast cancer and death by breast cancer between women with and without a family history. METHODS: The Swedish Family-Cancer Database was used to estimate the cumulative risk of breast cancer and death by breast cancer according to family history with a stratified Cox model. Family history was defined separately for affected mother or sister considering their diagnostic ages. RESULTS: The age to reach the same cumulative incidence as women without family history decreased with decreasing diagnostic age of the affected relative. Women with a maternal history reached the risk of women lacking a family history at the age of 50 years between 12.3 (mother affected &lt; 40 years) and 3.3 years (mother affected &gt; 82 years) earlier. The trend for breast cancer mortality was essentially similar. CONCLUSIONS: Women with mother or sister affected by breast cancer are diagnosed and die at earlier ages than do women without family history. The differences depend on the diagnostic age of the affected relative. The present data may provide a rationale to derive recommendations for the starting age of screening in women with affected family members. British Journal of Cancer (2010) 102, 42-47. doi:10.1038/sj.bjc.6605421 www.bjcancer.com Published online 10 November 2009 (C) 2010 Cancer Research UK},
  author       = {Brandt, A. and Bermejo, J. Lorenzo and Sundquist, Jan and Hemminki, Kari},
  issn         = {1532-1827},
  keyword      = {screening,age of onset,breast cancer,familial breast cancer,recommendations,cumulative risk},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {42--47},
  publisher    = {Nature Publishing Group},
  series       = {British Journal of Cancer},
  title        = {Age of onset in familial breast cancer as background data for medical surveillance},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/sj.bjc.6605421},
  volume       = {102},
  year         = {2010},
}