Advanced

Stability limits, single-leg jump, and body awareness in older Tai Chi practitioners.

Lundvik Gyllensten, Amanda LU ; Hui-Chan, Christina W Y and Tsang, William W N (2010) In Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation 91(2). p.215-220
Abstract
DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. SETTING: University-based rehabilitation center. PARTICIPANTS: Tai Chi practitioners (n=24; age+/-SD, 68.5+/-6.6 y) and control subjects (n=20; age, 71.3+/-6.7 y) were recruited. INTERVENTIONS: Not applicable. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Measures included the following: (1) subjects' intentional weight shifting to 8 different spatial positions within their base of support using the limits of stability test, (2) the ability to leave the floor in single-leg jumping and to maintain balance on landing using force platform measurements, and (3) body awareness and movement behaviors using the Body Awareness Scale-Health (BAS-H). RESULTS: The findings showed that Tai Chi practitioners had a significantly better ability... (More)
DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. SETTING: University-based rehabilitation center. PARTICIPANTS: Tai Chi practitioners (n=24; age+/-SD, 68.5+/-6.6 y) and control subjects (n=20; age, 71.3+/-6.7 y) were recruited. INTERVENTIONS: Not applicable. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Measures included the following: (1) subjects' intentional weight shifting to 8 different spatial positions within their base of support using the limits of stability test, (2) the ability to leave the floor in single-leg jumping and to maintain balance on landing using force platform measurements, and (3) body awareness and movement behaviors using the Body Awareness Scale-Health (BAS-H). RESULTS: The findings showed that Tai Chi practitioners had a significantly better ability to lean further without losing stability and better directional control (P<0.01). They had a better ability to jump off the floor (P<0.05) and to maintain a longer single-leg stance after landing (P<.05) and better overall body awareness (P<.001). The single-leg jumps also correlated significantly with limits of stability measures of movement velocity, endpoint excursions, and maximum excursions but not with directional control. The BAS-H scores correlated significantly with the limits of stability measures except directional control. They also correlated significantly with the ability to jump off the floor and maintain stability after landing. CONCLUSIONS: When compared with healthy controls, Tai Chi practitioners had better stability limits, increased ability to perform a single-leg jump, and more stability in landing on 1 leg as well as better body awareness. Significant correlations among limits of stability measures, single-leg jumping tests, and the BAS-H scores indicate the importance of body awareness in limits of stability, single-leg jumping, and landing. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
volume
91
issue
2
pages
215 - 220
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000277417600009
  • pmid:20159124
  • scopus:76049105051
ISSN
0003-9993
DOI
10.1016/j.apmr.2009.10.009
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
d4f03eb4-5025-4c03-82db-5be422d8a773 (old id 1552619)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20159124?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2010-03-03 14:17:07
date last changed
2018-05-29 09:35:11
@article{d4f03eb4-5025-4c03-82db-5be422d8a773,
  abstract     = {DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. SETTING: University-based rehabilitation center. PARTICIPANTS: Tai Chi practitioners (n=24; age+/-SD, 68.5+/-6.6 y) and control subjects (n=20; age, 71.3+/-6.7 y) were recruited. INTERVENTIONS: Not applicable. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Measures included the following: (1) subjects' intentional weight shifting to 8 different spatial positions within their base of support using the limits of stability test, (2) the ability to leave the floor in single-leg jumping and to maintain balance on landing using force platform measurements, and (3) body awareness and movement behaviors using the Body Awareness Scale-Health (BAS-H). RESULTS: The findings showed that Tai Chi practitioners had a significantly better ability to lean further without losing stability and better directional control (P&lt;0.01). They had a better ability to jump off the floor (P&lt;0.05) and to maintain a longer single-leg stance after landing (P&lt;.05) and better overall body awareness (P&lt;.001). The single-leg jumps also correlated significantly with limits of stability measures of movement velocity, endpoint excursions, and maximum excursions but not with directional control. The BAS-H scores correlated significantly with the limits of stability measures except directional control. They also correlated significantly with the ability to jump off the floor and maintain stability after landing. CONCLUSIONS: When compared with healthy controls, Tai Chi practitioners had better stability limits, increased ability to perform a single-leg jump, and more stability in landing on 1 leg as well as better body awareness. Significant correlations among limits of stability measures, single-leg jumping tests, and the BAS-H scores indicate the importance of body awareness in limits of stability, single-leg jumping, and landing.},
  author       = {Lundvik Gyllensten, Amanda and Hui-Chan, Christina W Y and Tsang, William W N},
  issn         = {0003-9993},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {215--220},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation},
  title        = {Stability limits, single-leg jump, and body awareness in older Tai Chi practitioners.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.apmr.2009.10.009},
  volume       = {91},
  year         = {2010},
}