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Community-level birth rate: a missing link between ecology, evolution and diversity

Bruun, Hans Henrik LU and Ejrnæs, Rasmus (2006) In Oikos 113(1). p.185-191
Abstract
We propose a conceptual model to explain the variation in species richness in local communities and in build-up of regional species pools over time. The idea is that the opportunity for new species to enter a community (its invasibility) determines the present richness of that community as well as the long-term build-up of a species pool by speciation and migration. We propose that a community's invasibility is determined by the turnover rate of reproductive genets in the community, which we call the 'community-level birth rate'. The faster the turn-over, the more species will accumulate per unit time and per unit community size (number of genets) at a given per-birth rate of immigration and speciation. Spatially discrete communities... (More)
We propose a conceptual model to explain the variation in species richness in local communities and in build-up of regional species pools over time. The idea is that the opportunity for new species to enter a community (its invasibility) determines the present richness of that community as well as the long-term build-up of a species pool by speciation and migration. We propose that a community's invasibility is determined by the turnover rate of reproductive genets in the community, which we call the 'community-level birth rate'. The faster the turn-over, the more species will accumulate per unit time and per unit community size (number of genets) at a given per-birth rate of immigration and speciation. Spatially discrete communities inhabiting similar environments sum up to metacommunities, whose inhabitant species constitute the regional species pool. We propose that the size of a regional species pool is determined by the aggregate community-level birth rate, the size of the metacommunity through time and age of the metacommunity. Thus, the novel contribution is our proposal of a direct effect of local environment on the build-up rate of species pools. The relative importance of immigrating species and neospecies originating locally will change with the temporal and spatial scale under consideration. We propose that the diversification rate specific to evolutionary lineages and the build-up rate of species pools are two sides of the same coin, and that they are both depending on mean generation time. The proposed model offers a reconciliation of two contrasting paradigms in current community ecology, viz. one focussing on present-time ecological processes and one focussing on historical events governing the size of species pools which in turn determines local richness (Less)
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author
and
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Oikos
volume
113
issue
1
pages
185 - 191
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • wos:000235418400018
  • scopus:33645121069
ISSN
1600-0706
DOI
10.1111/j.0030-1299.2001.14174.x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
additional info
The information about affiliations in this record was updated in December 2015. The record was previously connected to the following departments: Plant Ecology and Systematics (Closed 2011) (011004000)
id
0f8876de-ceda-4033-b9d3-e9243ac24830 (old id 155264)
date added to LUP
2016-04-01 11:43:37
date last changed
2021-05-19 02:42:29
@article{0f8876de-ceda-4033-b9d3-e9243ac24830,
  abstract     = {We propose a conceptual model to explain the variation in species richness in local communities and in build-up of regional species pools over time. The idea is that the opportunity for new species to enter a community (its invasibility) determines the present richness of that community as well as the long-term build-up of a species pool by speciation and migration. We propose that a community's invasibility is determined by the turnover rate of reproductive genets in the community, which we call the 'community-level birth rate'. The faster the turn-over, the more species will accumulate per unit time and per unit community size (number of genets) at a given per-birth rate of immigration and speciation. Spatially discrete communities inhabiting similar environments sum up to metacommunities, whose inhabitant species constitute the regional species pool. We propose that the size of a regional species pool is determined by the aggregate community-level birth rate, the size of the metacommunity through time and age of the metacommunity. Thus, the novel contribution is our proposal of a direct effect of local environment on the build-up rate of species pools. The relative importance of immigrating species and neospecies originating locally will change with the temporal and spatial scale under consideration. We propose that the diversification rate specific to evolutionary lineages and the build-up rate of species pools are two sides of the same coin, and that they are both depending on mean generation time. The proposed model offers a reconciliation of two contrasting paradigms in current community ecology, viz. one focussing on present-time ecological processes and one focussing on historical events governing the size of species pools which in turn determines local richness},
  author       = {Bruun, Hans Henrik and Ejrnæs, Rasmus},
  issn         = {1600-0706},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {185--191},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Oikos},
  title        = {Community-level birth rate: a missing link between ecology, evolution and diversity},
  url          = {https://lup.lub.lu.se/search/files/2613703/625383.pdf},
  doi          = {10.1111/j.0030-1299.2001.14174.x},
  volume       = {113},
  year         = {2006},
}