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Culture and International Mediation: Exploring theoretical and empirical linkages

Elgström, Ole LU and Bercovitch, Jacob (2001) In International Negotiation 6(1). p.3-23
Abstract
Culture is undoubtedly one of the most significant aspects of identity, yet our understanding of the concept and particularly of its consequences for international conflict management is underdeveloped. In this article, we test the hypothesis that cultural differences between parties reflect diversity and contradictions, and that these differences compound the difficulties faced by conflicting parties in finding effective mediated outcomes. Several theories that deal with culture's impact on conflict management are presented and a model is introduced that permits us to test the hypothesis empirically. Five variables that measure culture are examined; these include geographical proximity, nature of the political system, political rights,... (More)
Culture is undoubtedly one of the most significant aspects of identity, yet our understanding of the concept and particularly of its consequences for international conflict management is underdeveloped. In this article, we test the hypothesis that cultural differences between parties reflect diversity and contradictions, and that these differences compound the difficulties faced by conflicting parties in finding effective mediated outcomes. Several theories that deal with culture's impact on conflict management are presented and a model is introduced that permits us to test the hypothesis empirically. Five variables that measure culture are examined; these include geographical proximity, nature of the political system, political rights, civil rights and religion. The analysis suggests that all but one (nature of the political system) have a significant impact on mediation outcomes. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Förhandlingar, Internationell politik
in
International Negotiation
volume
6
issue
1
pages
3 - 23
publisher
Brill Academic Publishers
ISSN
1382-340X
DOI
10.1163/15718060120848937
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
2687a01a-2c26-4593-9496-d13b56cc93ac (old id 156309)
date added to LUP
2007-06-25 08:51:14
date last changed
2016-04-16 04:00:30
@article{2687a01a-2c26-4593-9496-d13b56cc93ac,
  abstract     = {Culture is undoubtedly one of the most significant aspects of identity, yet our understanding of the concept and particularly of its consequences for international conflict management is underdeveloped. In this article, we test the hypothesis that cultural differences between parties reflect diversity and contradictions, and that these differences compound the difficulties faced by conflicting parties in finding effective mediated outcomes. Several theories that deal with culture's impact on conflict management are presented and a model is introduced that permits us to test the hypothesis empirically. Five variables that measure culture are examined; these include geographical proximity, nature of the political system, political rights, civil rights and religion. The analysis suggests that all but one (nature of the political system) have a significant impact on mediation outcomes.},
  author       = {Elgström, Ole and Bercovitch, Jacob},
  issn         = {1382-340X},
  keyword      = {Förhandlingar,Internationell politik},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {3--23},
  publisher    = {Brill Academic Publishers},
  series       = {International Negotiation},
  title        = {Culture and International Mediation: Exploring theoretical and empirical linkages},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/15718060120848937},
  volume       = {6},
  year         = {2001},
}