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Familial Risks for Type 2 Diabetes in Sweden

Hemminki, Kari LU ; Li, Xinjun LU ; Sundquist, Kristina LU and Sundquist, Jan LU (2010) In Diabetes Care 33(2). p.293-297
Abstract
OBJECTIVE - Our aim was to characterize familial risks for type 2 diabetes by the type and number of affected family members, including half-siblings, adoptees, and spouses, to quantify risks and estimate the contribution of environmental effect. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - Families were identified from the Multigeneration Register, and type 2 diabetic patients were obtained from the Hospital Discharge Register. Standardized incidence ratios were calculated for offspring with type 2 diabetes whose family members were hospitalized for type 2 diabetes at ages >39 years compared With those lacking affected family members. RESULTS - The number of hospitalized type 2 diabetic patients was 157,549. Among 27,895 offspring, 27.9% had a parent... (More)
OBJECTIVE - Our aim was to characterize familial risks for type 2 diabetes by the type and number of affected family members, including half-siblings, adoptees, and spouses, to quantify risks and estimate the contribution of environmental effect. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - Families were identified from the Multigeneration Register, and type 2 diabetic patients were obtained from the Hospital Discharge Register. Standardized incidence ratios were calculated for offspring with type 2 diabetes whose family members were hospitalized for type 2 diabetes at ages >39 years compared With those lacking affected family members. RESULTS - The number of hospitalized type 2 diabetic patients was 157,549. Among 27,895 offspring, 27.9% had a parent or sibling also hospitalized for type 2 diabetes. The familial relative risk (RR) ranged from 2.0 to >30, depending on the number and type of probands. The highest RRs of type 2 diabetes were found in individuals who had at least two siblings affected by type 2 diabetes, irrespective of the parental disease. Adoptees showed no risk from adopted parents. CONCLUSIONS - The Study, the largest yet published, showed that familial RRs varied by the number and type Of affected family member. However, much Of the familial clustering remains yet to be genetically explained. The high risk should be recognized in clinical genetic counseling. The data from adoptees confirmed the genetic basis Of the familial associations, but those from half siblings and Spouses Suggested that a smaller part of familial Clustering may be accounted for by environmental factors. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Diabetes Care
volume
33
issue
2
pages
293 - 297
publisher
American Diabetes Association
external identifiers
  • wos:000275143700016
  • scopus:75149178737
ISSN
1935-5548
DOI
10.2337/dc09-0947
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
2f3d9e33-4d5d-4690-8fd0-7d05ab5dfca3 (old id 1589657)
date added to LUP
2010-04-20 09:40:54
date last changed
2018-07-15 03:56:52
@article{2f3d9e33-4d5d-4690-8fd0-7d05ab5dfca3,
  abstract     = {OBJECTIVE - Our aim was to characterize familial risks for type 2 diabetes by the type and number of affected family members, including half-siblings, adoptees, and spouses, to quantify risks and estimate the contribution of environmental effect. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - Families were identified from the Multigeneration Register, and type 2 diabetic patients were obtained from the Hospital Discharge Register. Standardized incidence ratios were calculated for offspring with type 2 diabetes whose family members were hospitalized for type 2 diabetes at ages >39 years compared With those lacking affected family members. RESULTS - The number of hospitalized type 2 diabetic patients was 157,549. Among 27,895 offspring, 27.9% had a parent or sibling also hospitalized for type 2 diabetes. The familial relative risk (RR) ranged from 2.0 to >30, depending on the number and type of probands. The highest RRs of type 2 diabetes were found in individuals who had at least two siblings affected by type 2 diabetes, irrespective of the parental disease. Adoptees showed no risk from adopted parents. CONCLUSIONS - The Study, the largest yet published, showed that familial RRs varied by the number and type Of affected family member. However, much Of the familial clustering remains yet to be genetically explained. The high risk should be recognized in clinical genetic counseling. The data from adoptees confirmed the genetic basis Of the familial associations, but those from half siblings and Spouses Suggested that a smaller part of familial Clustering may be accounted for by environmental factors.},
  author       = {Hemminki, Kari and Li, Xinjun and Sundquist, Kristina and Sundquist, Jan},
  issn         = {1935-5548},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {293--297},
  publisher    = {American Diabetes Association},
  series       = {Diabetes Care},
  title        = {Familial Risks for Type 2 Diabetes in Sweden},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.2337/dc09-0947},
  volume       = {33},
  year         = {2010},
}