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The Elite-Plus stem migrates more than the flanged Charnley stem. A clinical, radiographic, and radiostereometric analysis of 114 patients with an average of 7 years follow-up

von Schewelov, Thord LU ; Sanzén, Lennart LU ; Besjakov, Jack LU and Carlsson, Åke LU (2010) In Acta Orthopaedica 81(3). p.280-285
Abstract
Background and purpose The Charnley Elite-Plus stem was introduced in 1993 as a presumed improvement of the flanged Charnley stem. We started this study in 1996 to investigate the migratory pattern of the Elite-Plus stem. Patients and methods We followed 114 patients with osteoarthritis and a primary total hip replacement with the Elite-Plus stem. Mean age at the time of operation was 64 (50-76) years. The mean follow-up time was 6.5 (2-7) years. Radiographs were evaluated with respect to cementing technique, migration, and wear measured by radiostereometry (RSA). Results The stem survival was 98% (CI: 96-100) at 7 years and 92% (CI: 86-97) at 10 years. Mean migration of the femoral head was 0.35 mm (SD 0.3) medially, 0.51 mm (SD 0.6)... (More)
Background and purpose The Charnley Elite-Plus stem was introduced in 1993 as a presumed improvement of the flanged Charnley stem. We started this study in 1996 to investigate the migratory pattern of the Elite-Plus stem. Patients and methods We followed 114 patients with osteoarthritis and a primary total hip replacement with the Elite-Plus stem. Mean age at the time of operation was 64 (50-76) years. The mean follow-up time was 6.5 (2-7) years. Radiographs were evaluated with respect to cementing technique, migration, and wear measured by radiostereometry (RSA). Results The stem survival was 98% (CI: 96-100) at 7 years and 92% (CI: 86-97) at 10 years. Mean migration of the femoral head was 0.35 mm (SD 0.3) medially, 0.51 mm (SD 0.6) distally, and 1.1 mm (SD 1.8) in the dorsal direction. Mean total point motion was 1.7 mm (SD 1.7). The migration of the stems stabilized after 5 years in the medial and dorsal directions, but continued to subside slightly. Migration along any of the axes was higher if the cementing technique was inferior. Interpretation Patients with a Charnley Elite-Plus stem and defects in the cement mantle or other signs of inferior implantation technique should be carefully monitored. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Acta Orthopaedica
volume
81
issue
3
pages
280 - 285
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • wos:000279535900003
  • pmid:20367422
  • scopus:77952871322
ISSN
1745-3682
DOI
10.3109/17453674.2010.480937
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
5fa55f2e-64a3-47c6-a32e-470f60fecefe (old id 1595605)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20367422?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2010-05-04 09:40:21
date last changed
2018-05-29 09:57:29
@article{5fa55f2e-64a3-47c6-a32e-470f60fecefe,
  abstract     = {Background and purpose The Charnley Elite-Plus stem was introduced in 1993 as a presumed improvement of the flanged Charnley stem. We started this study in 1996 to investigate the migratory pattern of the Elite-Plus stem. Patients and methods We followed 114 patients with osteoarthritis and a primary total hip replacement with the Elite-Plus stem. Mean age at the time of operation was 64 (50-76) years. The mean follow-up time was 6.5 (2-7) years. Radiographs were evaluated with respect to cementing technique, migration, and wear measured by radiostereometry (RSA). Results The stem survival was 98% (CI: 96-100) at 7 years and 92% (CI: 86-97) at 10 years. Mean migration of the femoral head was 0.35 mm (SD 0.3) medially, 0.51 mm (SD 0.6) distally, and 1.1 mm (SD 1.8) in the dorsal direction. Mean total point motion was 1.7 mm (SD 1.7). The migration of the stems stabilized after 5 years in the medial and dorsal directions, but continued to subside slightly. Migration along any of the axes was higher if the cementing technique was inferior. Interpretation Patients with a Charnley Elite-Plus stem and defects in the cement mantle or other signs of inferior implantation technique should be carefully monitored.},
  author       = {von Schewelov, Thord and Sanzén, Lennart and Besjakov, Jack and Carlsson, Åke},
  issn         = {1745-3682},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {280--285},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Acta Orthopaedica},
  title        = {The Elite-Plus stem migrates more than the flanged Charnley stem. A clinical, radiographic, and radiostereometric analysis of 114 patients with an average of 7 years follow-up},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/17453674.2010.480937},
  volume       = {81},
  year         = {2010},
}