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Experience influences oviposition behaviour in two pyralid moths, Ephestia cautella and Plodia interpunctella

Olsson, Christian LU ; Anderbrant, Olle LU and Löfstedt, Christer LU (2006) In Animal Behaviour 72(3). p.545-551
Abstract
We investigated the importance of experience for oviposition behaviour in two pyralid moths, the almond moth, Ephestia cautella, and the Indian meal moth, Plodia interpunctella. We used two diets one based on wheat and the other consisting of nut-containing chocolate. Larvae were reared in one of the two diets (larval feeding) and then adults were exposed to the two diets during and after eclosion (pre-exposure). Larval feeding had an enhancing effect on the subsequent oviposition behaviour in E. cautella females, but not in P. interpunctella. This shows that the Hopkins' host selection principle to some extent applies in E. cautella. The pre-exposure strongly reinforced the ovipositional response to the previously encountered diet in both... (More)
We investigated the importance of experience for oviposition behaviour in two pyralid moths, the almond moth, Ephestia cautella, and the Indian meal moth, Plodia interpunctella. We used two diets one based on wheat and the other consisting of nut-containing chocolate. Larvae were reared in one of the two diets (larval feeding) and then adults were exposed to the two diets during and after eclosion (pre-exposure). Larval feeding had an enhancing effect on the subsequent oviposition behaviour in E. cautella females, but not in P. interpunctella. This shows that the Hopkins' host selection principle to some extent applies in E. cautella. The pre-exposure strongly reinforced the ovipositional response to the previously encountered diet in both species. This effect might be caused by imprinting of the surrounding conditions in the females while emerging, and by stimulated oviposition when the imprinted cues are recognized by the gravid females. We observed both host location (flight) and host acceptance (oviposition), and the effect of experience was most prominent in the host acceptance step of the host selection behaviour. Since host acceptance is believed to be the most crucial decision step for offspring viability, this distinction was expected. (c) 2006 The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour. (Less)
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type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Animal Behaviour
volume
72
issue
3
pages
545 - 551
publisher
Elsevier Ltd
external identifiers
  • wos:000240730300006
  • scopus:33748162595
ISSN
1095-8282
DOI
10.1016/j.anbehav.2005.10.023
project
Pheromones and kairomones for control of stored product pests
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
a569eb4b-ad20-45c0-93db-3640e4f8272e (old id 162720)
date added to LUP
2016-04-01 12:11:12
date last changed
2021-09-29 05:01:01
@article{a569eb4b-ad20-45c0-93db-3640e4f8272e,
  abstract     = {We investigated the importance of experience for oviposition behaviour in two pyralid moths, the almond moth, Ephestia cautella, and the Indian meal moth, Plodia interpunctella. We used two diets one based on wheat and the other consisting of nut-containing chocolate. Larvae were reared in one of the two diets (larval feeding) and then adults were exposed to the two diets during and after eclosion (pre-exposure). Larval feeding had an enhancing effect on the subsequent oviposition behaviour in E. cautella females, but not in P. interpunctella. This shows that the Hopkins' host selection principle to some extent applies in E. cautella. The pre-exposure strongly reinforced the ovipositional response to the previously encountered diet in both species. This effect might be caused by imprinting of the surrounding conditions in the females while emerging, and by stimulated oviposition when the imprinted cues are recognized by the gravid females. We observed both host location (flight) and host acceptance (oviposition), and the effect of experience was most prominent in the host acceptance step of the host selection behaviour. Since host acceptance is believed to be the most crucial decision step for offspring viability, this distinction was expected. (c) 2006 The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour.},
  author       = {Olsson, Christian and Anderbrant, Olle and Löfstedt, Christer},
  issn         = {1095-8282},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {545--551},
  publisher    = {Elsevier Ltd},
  series       = {Animal Behaviour},
  title        = {Experience influences oviposition behaviour in two pyralid moths, <i>Ephestia cautella</i> and <i>Plodia interpunctella</i>},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.anbehav.2005.10.023},
  doi          = {10.1016/j.anbehav.2005.10.023},
  volume       = {72},
  year         = {2006},
}