Advanced

Risk of Cancer Following Hospitalization for Type 2 Diabetes

Hemminki, Kari LU ; Li, Xinjun LU ; Sundquist, Jan LU and Sundquist, Kristina LU (2010) In Oncologist 15(6). p.548-555
Abstract
Objectives. Cancer and type 2 diabetes (T2D) are two common diseases that may share risk factors. We aimed at determining subsequent cancer risks in patients hospitalized for T2D in Sweden. Methods. T2D patients were obtained from the nationwide Hospital Discharge Register; cancers were recorded from the Swedish Cancer Registry. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated for cancer following last hospitalization for T2D. The comparison group was the general Swedish population. Results. The number of hospitalized T2D patients from 1964 to 2007 was 125,126, of whom 26,641 had an affected family member. Altogether 24 cancers showed an elevated risk when follow-up was started after the last hospitalization. The highest SIRs were for... (More)
Objectives. Cancer and type 2 diabetes (T2D) are two common diseases that may share risk factors. We aimed at determining subsequent cancer risks in patients hospitalized for T2D in Sweden. Methods. T2D patients were obtained from the nationwide Hospital Discharge Register; cancers were recorded from the Swedish Cancer Registry. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated for cancer following last hospitalization for T2D. The comparison group was the general Swedish population. Results. The number of hospitalized T2D patients from 1964 to 2007 was 125,126, of whom 26,641 had an affected family member. Altogether 24 cancers showed an elevated risk when follow-up was started after the last hospitalization. The highest SIRs were for pancreatic (6.08) and liver (4.25) cancers. The incidences of these cancers were even elevated when follow-up was started 5 years after the last hospitalization for T2D, with primary liver cancer showing the highest SIR of 4.66. Also increased were the incidences of upper aerodigestive tract, esophageal, colon, rectal, pancreatic, lung, cervical, endometrial, ovarian, and kidney cancers. Prostate cancer showed a lower risk. Familial T2D patients showed no exceptional elevated cancer risks but their prostate cancer and melanoma risks were lower. Conclusions. This study, covering approximately one half of Swedish T2D patients, showed an elevated risk for several cancers after hospitalization for T2D, probably indicating the profound metabolic disturbances of the underlying disease. The highest risks were found for liver and pancreatic cancers. No excess cancer risks were observed in familial diabetics. The lower risk for prostate cancer remains intriguing. The Oncologist 2010;15:548-555 (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Liver cancer, Risk factors, Diabetes, Cancer, Prostate cancer
in
Oncologist
volume
15
issue
6
pages
548 - 555
publisher
AlphaMed Press
external identifiers
  • wos:000279113300003
  • scopus:77954986682
ISSN
1083-7159
DOI
10.1634/theoncologist.2009-0300
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
870e4a54-7a45-4838-a4be-82430b33e33b (old id 1629956)
date added to LUP
2010-07-22 09:36:01
date last changed
2018-05-29 11:38:13
@article{870e4a54-7a45-4838-a4be-82430b33e33b,
  abstract     = {Objectives. Cancer and type 2 diabetes (T2D) are two common diseases that may share risk factors. We aimed at determining subsequent cancer risks in patients hospitalized for T2D in Sweden. Methods. T2D patients were obtained from the nationwide Hospital Discharge Register; cancers were recorded from the Swedish Cancer Registry. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated for cancer following last hospitalization for T2D. The comparison group was the general Swedish population. Results. The number of hospitalized T2D patients from 1964 to 2007 was 125,126, of whom 26,641 had an affected family member. Altogether 24 cancers showed an elevated risk when follow-up was started after the last hospitalization. The highest SIRs were for pancreatic (6.08) and liver (4.25) cancers. The incidences of these cancers were even elevated when follow-up was started 5 years after the last hospitalization for T2D, with primary liver cancer showing the highest SIR of 4.66. Also increased were the incidences of upper aerodigestive tract, esophageal, colon, rectal, pancreatic, lung, cervical, endometrial, ovarian, and kidney cancers. Prostate cancer showed a lower risk. Familial T2D patients showed no exceptional elevated cancer risks but their prostate cancer and melanoma risks were lower. Conclusions. This study, covering approximately one half of Swedish T2D patients, showed an elevated risk for several cancers after hospitalization for T2D, probably indicating the profound metabolic disturbances of the underlying disease. The highest risks were found for liver and pancreatic cancers. No excess cancer risks were observed in familial diabetics. The lower risk for prostate cancer remains intriguing. The Oncologist 2010;15:548-555},
  author       = {Hemminki, Kari and Li, Xinjun and Sundquist, Jan and Sundquist, Kristina},
  issn         = {1083-7159},
  keyword      = {Liver cancer,Risk factors,Diabetes,Cancer,Prostate cancer},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {548--555},
  publisher    = {AlphaMed Press},
  series       = {Oncologist},
  title        = {Risk of Cancer Following Hospitalization for Type 2 Diabetes},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1634/theoncologist.2009-0300},
  volume       = {15},
  year         = {2010},
}