Advanced

Internet-based assessment of medical students' ophthalmoscopy skills.

Åsman, Peter LU and Lindén, Christina (2010) In Acta Ophthalmologica 88. p.854-857
Abstract
Abstract. Purpose: Ophthalmoscopy is an important skill in undergraduate medical education. The use and outcome of a novel Internet-based method for assessing motor skills-related aspects of ophthalmoscopy skills in medical students are described. Methods: A total of 139 students in Malmö and 255 students in Umeå were assessed during four consecutive semesters. An optic disc photograph was obtained in each student. At assessment each student was asked to examine the eye of a fellow student. Fifteen disc photographs were displayed on a computer screen. One of the photographs was from the fellow student. The remaining images had been randomly selected. The student was asked to identify the optic disc of the fellow student from the 15... (More)
Abstract. Purpose: Ophthalmoscopy is an important skill in undergraduate medical education. The use and outcome of a novel Internet-based method for assessing motor skills-related aspects of ophthalmoscopy skills in medical students are described. Methods: A total of 139 students in Malmö and 255 students in Umeå were assessed during four consecutive semesters. An optic disc photograph was obtained in each student. At assessment each student was asked to examine the eye of a fellow student. Fifteen disc photographs were displayed on a computer screen. One of the photographs was from the fellow student. The remaining images had been randomly selected. The student was asked to identify the optic disc of the fellow student from the 15 photographs on the screen. In one semester, the time spent on this by each student was recorded. Results: All students completed the task. The average pass ratio was 96.4% (ranging from 94.0% to 98.0%). Median student times were 5.53 mins in Malmö and 6.36 mins in Umeå. Conclusions: This is the first automated, Internet-based assessment of an ophthalmic motor skill performed in co-operation between universities. The method used bears more similarities to real-life ophthalmoscopy than methods that use model eyes. Time investments and infrastructure demands were comparatively low. The method was designed for stand-alone assessment of ophthalmoscopy or as an objective structured clinical examination station, but it may also be used during the learning process. The collaboration between universities was easily transformed into routine practice and similar projects should be encouraged to increase the standardization of assessment. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
SoTL
categories
Higher Education
in
Acta Ophthalmologica
volume
88
pages
854 - 857
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • wos:000284699100020
  • pmid:20636442
  • scopus:78649848377
ISSN
1755-3768
DOI
10.1111/j.1755-3768.2009.01601.x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
9b4ad63d-1f33-4e06-851d-723a8691dbb3 (old id 1644884)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20636442?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2010-08-03 09:33:33
date last changed
2018-06-03 04:31:49
@article{9b4ad63d-1f33-4e06-851d-723a8691dbb3,
  abstract     = {Abstract. Purpose: Ophthalmoscopy is an important skill in undergraduate medical education. The use and outcome of a novel Internet-based method for assessing motor skills-related aspects of ophthalmoscopy skills in medical students are described. Methods: A total of 139 students in Malmö and 255 students in Umeå were assessed during four consecutive semesters. An optic disc photograph was obtained in each student. At assessment each student was asked to examine the eye of a fellow student. Fifteen disc photographs were displayed on a computer screen. One of the photographs was from the fellow student. The remaining images had been randomly selected. The student was asked to identify the optic disc of the fellow student from the 15 photographs on the screen. In one semester, the time spent on this by each student was recorded. Results: All students completed the task. The average pass ratio was 96.4% (ranging from 94.0% to 98.0%). Median student times were 5.53 mins in Malmö and 6.36 mins in Umeå. Conclusions: This is the first automated, Internet-based assessment of an ophthalmic motor skill performed in co-operation between universities. The method used bears more similarities to real-life ophthalmoscopy than methods that use model eyes. Time investments and infrastructure demands were comparatively low. The method was designed for stand-alone assessment of ophthalmoscopy or as an objective structured clinical examination station, but it may also be used during the learning process. The collaboration between universities was easily transformed into routine practice and similar projects should be encouraged to increase the standardization of assessment.},
  author       = {Åsman, Peter and Lindén, Christina},
  issn         = {1755-3768},
  keyword      = {SoTL},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {854--857},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Acta Ophthalmologica},
  title        = {Internet-based assessment of medical students' ophthalmoscopy skills.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1755-3768.2009.01601.x},
  volume       = {88},
  year         = {2010},
}