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Acquisition, extinction, and reacquisition of a cerebellar cortical memory trace.

Jirenhed, Dan-Anders LU ; Bengtsson, Fredrik LU and Hesslow, Germund LU (2007) In J Neurosci 27(10). p.2493-2502
Abstract
Associative learning in the cerebellum underlies motor memories and probably also cognitive associations. Pavlovian eyeblink conditioning, a widely used experimental model of such learning, depends on the cerebellum, but the memory locus within the cerebellum as well as the underlying mechanisms have remained controversial. To date, crucial information on how cerebellar Purkinje cells change their activity during learning has been ambiguous and contradictory, and there is no information at all about how they behave during extinction and reacquisition. We have now tracked the activity of single Purkinje cells with microelectrodes for up to 16 h in decerebrate ferrets during learning, extinction, and relearning. We demonstrate that paired... (More)
Associative learning in the cerebellum underlies motor memories and probably also cognitive associations. Pavlovian eyeblink conditioning, a widely used experimental model of such learning, depends on the cerebellum, but the memory locus within the cerebellum as well as the underlying mechanisms have remained controversial. To date, crucial information on how cerebellar Purkinje cells change their activity during learning has been ambiguous and contradictory, and there is no information at all about how they behave during extinction and reacquisition. We have now tracked the activity of single Purkinje cells with microelectrodes for up to 16 h in decerebrate ferrets during learning, extinction, and relearning. We demonstrate that paired peripheral forelimb and periocular stimulation, as well as paired direct stimulation of cerebellar afferent pathways (mossy and climbing fibers) consistently causes a gradual acquisition of an inhibitory response in Purkinje cell simple spike firing. This conditioned cell response has several properties that matches known features of the behavioral conditioned response. The response latency varies with the interstimulus interval, and the response maximum is adaptively timed to precede the unconditioned stimulus. Across training trials, it matches behavioral extinction to unpaired stimulation and also the substantial savings that occur when paired stimulation is reinstated. These data suggest that many of the basic behavioral phenomena in eyeblink conditioning can be explained at the level of the single Purkinje cell. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
climbing fiber, eyeblink, classical conditioning, Purkinje cell, mossy fiber
in
J Neurosci
volume
27
issue
10
pages
2493 - 2502
publisher
Society for Neuroscience
external identifiers
  • wos:000244758900008
  • scopus:33847770751
ISSN
1529-2401
DOI
10.1523/JNEUROSCI.4202-06.2007
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
10e58507-197b-4282-ac4b-a2d2134b3458 (old id 166739)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=17344387&dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2007-07-13 15:56:36
date last changed
2017-10-08 04:20:57
@article{10e58507-197b-4282-ac4b-a2d2134b3458,
  abstract     = {Associative learning in the cerebellum underlies motor memories and probably also cognitive associations. Pavlovian eyeblink conditioning, a widely used experimental model of such learning, depends on the cerebellum, but the memory locus within the cerebellum as well as the underlying mechanisms have remained controversial. To date, crucial information on how cerebellar Purkinje cells change their activity during learning has been ambiguous and contradictory, and there is no information at all about how they behave during extinction and reacquisition. We have now tracked the activity of single Purkinje cells with microelectrodes for up to 16 h in decerebrate ferrets during learning, extinction, and relearning. We demonstrate that paired peripheral forelimb and periocular stimulation, as well as paired direct stimulation of cerebellar afferent pathways (mossy and climbing fibers) consistently causes a gradual acquisition of an inhibitory response in Purkinje cell simple spike firing. This conditioned cell response has several properties that matches known features of the behavioral conditioned response. The response latency varies with the interstimulus interval, and the response maximum is adaptively timed to precede the unconditioned stimulus. Across training trials, it matches behavioral extinction to unpaired stimulation and also the substantial savings that occur when paired stimulation is reinstated. These data suggest that many of the basic behavioral phenomena in eyeblink conditioning can be explained at the level of the single Purkinje cell.},
  author       = {Jirenhed, Dan-Anders and Bengtsson, Fredrik and Hesslow, Germund},
  issn         = {1529-2401},
  keyword      = {climbing fiber,eyeblink,classical conditioning,Purkinje cell,mossy fiber},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {10},
  pages        = {2493--2502},
  publisher    = {Society for Neuroscience},
  series       = {J Neurosci},
  title        = {Acquisition, extinction, and reacquisition of a cerebellar cortical memory trace.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1523/JNEUROSCI.4202-06.2007},
  volume       = {27},
  year         = {2007},
}