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Multimodal design: Media structures, media principles and users’ meaning-making in printed and digital media

Holsanova, Jana LU and Nord, Andreas (2010) In Neue Medie - neue Formate. Ausdifferenzierung und Konvergenz in der Medienkommunikation p.81-103
Abstract
Modern media messages are visually fragmented since they are built up of various visual elements and units (Holsanova & Nord, 2010). This tendency has also been described as atomization of news texts (Knox, 2007) or as modularization of the text design (Bucher, 2000). Media messages are also multimodal in the sense that they contain delimited parts of text (articles, headlines, briefs, lists of items, fact boxes), static and dynamic pictures and graphics (photos, drawings, diagrams, graphs, maps, films, video clips, animations, typographic and layout elements) and auditive parts (speech files, sound, music, etc.). Moreover, media messages are multisequential since they offer various entry points and reading paths. Thus, there is no... (More)
Modern media messages are visually fragmented since they are built up of various visual elements and units (Holsanova & Nord, 2010). This tendency has also been described as atomization of news texts (Knox, 2007) or as modularization of the text design (Bucher, 2000). Media messages are also multimodal in the sense that they contain delimited parts of text (articles, headlines, briefs, lists of items, fact boxes), static and dynamic pictures and graphics (photos, drawings, diagrams, graphs, maps, films, video clips, animations, typographic and layout elements) and auditive parts (speech files, sound, music, etc.). Moreover, media messages are multisequential since they offer various entry points and reading paths. Thus, there is no obvious linear order in which these messages should be perceived. All these characteristics influence the reception of media messages. The following questions arise: How does the reader choose entry points and reading paths, and navigate in the media? How does the reader create coherence in the fragmented message? How does the reader integrate information coming from different sources (text, photos, graphs, etc.) in the process of meaning-making?

In our contribution, we will summarize relevant media design principles coming from various design disciplines (information design, document design, multimedia design, web design) but also theoretical and applied works on media structures coming from media discourse, social semiotics, rhetoric, literary science and discourse analysis (section 2). A special focus will be on cognitive principles underlying media design, promoting interaction, integration and understanding of the message. Further, we connect production and reception perspectives and discuss the effect of media design principles on readers’ behaviour and users’ meaning-making (section 3). In particular, we show how the spatial proximity principle, the signalling principle and the dual scripting principle can support the reader, attract the reader’s attention, provide attentional guidance throughout the message, and facilitate information processing and semantic integration of the complex material. Finally, in section 4, we will discuss the relations between media structures, media design principles and different ways of reading. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceeding
publication status
published
subject
keywords
entry points, attentional guidance, media, reading paths, multimodal document design, production, reception, cognitive design principles, meaning-making
in
Neue Medie - neue Formate. Ausdifferenzierung und Konvergenz in der Medienkommunikation
editor
Bucher, Hans-Juergen; Gloning, Thomas; Lehnen, Katrin; ; and
pages
81 - 103
publisher
Campus: Frankfurt/New York
ISBN
978-3-593-39209-7
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
ef57788a-9dee-4a7a-a504-6fd42d9af912 (old id 1686857)
date added to LUP
2010-09-27 16:21:15
date last changed
2016-04-16 07:47:57
@inbook{ef57788a-9dee-4a7a-a504-6fd42d9af912,
  abstract     = {Modern media messages are visually fragmented since they are built up of various visual elements and units (Holsanova &amp; Nord, 2010). This tendency has also been described as atomization of news texts (Knox, 2007) or as modularization of the text design (Bucher, 2000). Media messages are also multimodal in the sense that they contain delimited parts of text (articles, headlines, briefs, lists of items, fact boxes), static and dynamic pictures and graphics (photos, drawings, diagrams, graphs, maps, films, video clips, animations, typographic and layout elements) and auditive parts (speech files, sound, music, etc.). Moreover, media messages are multisequential since they offer various entry points and reading paths. Thus, there is no obvious linear order in which these messages should be perceived. All these characteristics influence the reception of media messages. The following questions arise: How does the reader choose entry points and reading paths, and navigate in the media? How does the reader create coherence in the fragmented message? How does the reader integrate information coming from different sources (text, photos, graphs, etc.) in the process of meaning-making? <br/><br>
In our contribution, we will summarize relevant media design principles coming from various design disciplines (information design, document design, multimedia design, web design) but also theoretical and applied works on media structures coming from media discourse, social semiotics, rhetoric, literary science and discourse analysis (section 2). A special focus will be on cognitive principles underlying media design, promoting interaction, integration and understanding of the message. Further, we connect production and reception perspectives and discuss the effect of media design principles on readers’ behaviour and users’ meaning-making (section 3). In particular, we show how the spatial proximity principle, the signalling principle and the dual scripting principle can support the reader, attract the reader’s attention, provide attentional guidance throughout the message, and facilitate information processing and semantic integration of the complex material. Finally, in section 4, we will discuss the relations between media structures, media design principles and different ways of reading.},
  author       = {Holsanova, Jana and Nord, Andreas},
  editor       = {Bucher, Hans-Juergen and Gloning, Thomas and Lehnen, Katrin},
  isbn         = {978-3-593-39209-7},
  keyword      = {entry points,attentional guidance,media,reading paths,multimodal document design,production,reception,cognitive design principles,meaning-making},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {81--103},
  publisher    = {Campus: Frankfurt/New York},
  series       = {Neue Medie - neue Formate. Ausdifferenzierung und Konvergenz in der Medienkommunikation},
  title        = {Multimodal design: Media structures, media principles and users’ meaning-making in printed and digital media},
  year         = {2010},
}