Advanced

PCA3 as a diagnostic marker for prostate cancer: A validation study on a Swedish patient population.

Nyberg, Martin; Ulmert, David LU ; Lindgren, Anna LU ; Lindström, Ulla LU ; Abrahamsson, Per-Anders LU and Bjartell, Anders LU (2010) In Scandinavian journal of urology and nephrology 44. p.378-383
Abstract
Abstract Objective. Prostate cancer antigen 3 in urine (uPCA3) has been shown to perform better than total prostate-specific antigen in serum (tPSA) to predict prostate cancer (PCa) detection. The aim of this study was to validate the diagnostic precision of uPCA3 in a mixed set of patients with no previous history of PCa, including patients with previous negative biopsies. Material and methods. The study included 62 men scheduled for prostate biopsy at Skåne University Hospital Malmö, Sweden. Urine samples were obtained according to the Progensa™ uPCA3 assay. Logistic regression and receiver operating characteristic curves were used to test associations between levels of biomarkers and prostate cancer. Results. According to pathological... (More)
Abstract Objective. Prostate cancer antigen 3 in urine (uPCA3) has been shown to perform better than total prostate-specific antigen in serum (tPSA) to predict prostate cancer (PCa) detection. The aim of this study was to validate the diagnostic precision of uPCA3 in a mixed set of patients with no previous history of PCa, including patients with previous negative biopsies. Material and methods. The study included 62 men scheduled for prostate biopsy at Skåne University Hospital Malmö, Sweden. Urine samples were obtained according to the Progensa™ uPCA3 assay. Logistic regression and receiver operating characteristic curves were used to test associations between levels of biomarkers and prostate cancer. Results. According to pathological examination of core needle biopsies, PCa was found in 18 out of 62 patients. A one-step increase in uPCA3 was associated with an increase in the odds of cancer of 1.026 (p = 0.005). Differences in the odds ratio between uPCA3 and tPSA were not statistically significant. A model using both markers did not increase prediction of event. Areas under the curve for uPCA3, tPSA and a model combining uPCA3 and tPSA did not differ significantly. No significant correlation was found between uPCA3 and tPSA or prostate volume. Conclusion. In this small set of mixed patients uPCA3 alone and tPSA performed equally well as diagnostic markers for PCa. A combination of the two markers did not improve the diagnostic performance. This study does not support a role for the uPCA3 urine test to replace or be added to tPSA in PCa detection. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Scandinavian journal of urology and nephrology
volume
44
pages
378 - 383
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • WOS:000284316200002
  • PMID:20961267
  • Scopus:78649266031
ISSN
1651-2065
DOI
10.3109/00365599.2010.521187
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
34e4ec55-d1fb-4c02-b093-aea5660ed3ce (old id 1710922)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20961267?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2010-11-05 15:11:19
date last changed
2017-01-01 07:50:11
@article{34e4ec55-d1fb-4c02-b093-aea5660ed3ce,
  abstract     = {Abstract Objective. Prostate cancer antigen 3 in urine (uPCA3) has been shown to perform better than total prostate-specific antigen in serum (tPSA) to predict prostate cancer (PCa) detection. The aim of this study was to validate the diagnostic precision of uPCA3 in a mixed set of patients with no previous history of PCa, including patients with previous negative biopsies. Material and methods. The study included 62 men scheduled for prostate biopsy at Skåne University Hospital Malmö, Sweden. Urine samples were obtained according to the Progensa™ uPCA3 assay. Logistic regression and receiver operating characteristic curves were used to test associations between levels of biomarkers and prostate cancer. Results. According to pathological examination of core needle biopsies, PCa was found in 18 out of 62 patients. A one-step increase in uPCA3 was associated with an increase in the odds of cancer of 1.026 (p = 0.005). Differences in the odds ratio between uPCA3 and tPSA were not statistically significant. A model using both markers did not increase prediction of event. Areas under the curve for uPCA3, tPSA and a model combining uPCA3 and tPSA did not differ significantly. No significant correlation was found between uPCA3 and tPSA or prostate volume. Conclusion. In this small set of mixed patients uPCA3 alone and tPSA performed equally well as diagnostic markers for PCa. A combination of the two markers did not improve the diagnostic performance. This study does not support a role for the uPCA3 urine test to replace or be added to tPSA in PCa detection.},
  author       = {Nyberg, Martin and Ulmert, David and Lindgren, Anna and Lindström, Ulla and Abrahamsson, Per-Anders and Bjartell, Anders},
  issn         = {1651-2065},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {378--383},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Scandinavian journal of urology and nephrology},
  title        = {PCA3 as a diagnostic marker for prostate cancer: A validation study on a Swedish patient population.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/00365599.2010.521187},
  volume       = {44},
  year         = {2010},
}