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Lower prevalence of hip fractures in foreign-born individuals than in Swedish-born individuals during the period 1987-1999

Albin, Björn LU ; Hjelm, Katarina and Elmståhl, Sölve LU (2010) In BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders 11.
Abstract
Background: This is the first longitudinal study with a 22-year follow-up, based on a national and complete sample, to determine whether the prevalence of hip fracture and the age when it occurs are influenced by migration and by being foreign-born. Cultural background and environmental factors such as UV-radiation and lifestyle during childhood and adolescence may influence the risk of a hip fracture event later in life. Differences in prevalence might occur between the indigenous population and those who have migrated to a country. Methods: The study was based on national population data. The study population consisted of 321,407 Swedish-born and 307,174 foreign-born persons living in Sweden during the period 1987-1999. Results:... (More)
Background: This is the first longitudinal study with a 22-year follow-up, based on a national and complete sample, to determine whether the prevalence of hip fracture and the age when it occurs are influenced by migration and by being foreign-born. Cultural background and environmental factors such as UV-radiation and lifestyle during childhood and adolescence may influence the risk of a hip fracture event later in life. Differences in prevalence might occur between the indigenous population and those who have migrated to a country. Methods: The study was based on national population data. The study population consisted of 321,407 Swedish-born and 307,174 foreign-born persons living in Sweden during the period 1987-1999. Results: Foreign-born individuals had a reduced risk of hip fracture, with odds ratios (ORs) of 0.47-0.77 for men and 0.42-0.88 for women. Foreign-born women had the hip fracture event at a higher age on average, but a longer time spent in Sweden was associated with a small but significant increase in risk. Conclusions: We found that there was a reduced risk of hip fracture in all foreign-born individuals, and that the hip fracture event generally happened at a higher age in foreign-born women. Migration must therefore be considered in relation to the prevalence and risk of hip fracture. Migration can therefore have a positive effect on one aspect of the health of a population, and can influence and lower the total cost of healthcare due to reduced risk and prevalence of hip fracture. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
volume
11
publisher
BioMed Central
external identifiers
  • wos:000283234700002
  • scopus:77957373550
ISSN
1471-2474
DOI
10.1186/1471-2474-11-203
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
c113c895-ceff-4135-8eef-a2f5ad07bc89 (old id 1721083)
date added to LUP
2010-12-03 12:33:21
date last changed
2018-05-29 11:55:22
@article{c113c895-ceff-4135-8eef-a2f5ad07bc89,
  abstract     = {Background: This is the first longitudinal study with a 22-year follow-up, based on a national and complete sample, to determine whether the prevalence of hip fracture and the age when it occurs are influenced by migration and by being foreign-born. Cultural background and environmental factors such as UV-radiation and lifestyle during childhood and adolescence may influence the risk of a hip fracture event later in life. Differences in prevalence might occur between the indigenous population and those who have migrated to a country. Methods: The study was based on national population data. The study population consisted of 321,407 Swedish-born and 307,174 foreign-born persons living in Sweden during the period 1987-1999. Results: Foreign-born individuals had a reduced risk of hip fracture, with odds ratios (ORs) of 0.47-0.77 for men and 0.42-0.88 for women. Foreign-born women had the hip fracture event at a higher age on average, but a longer time spent in Sweden was associated with a small but significant increase in risk. Conclusions: We found that there was a reduced risk of hip fracture in all foreign-born individuals, and that the hip fracture event generally happened at a higher age in foreign-born women. Migration must therefore be considered in relation to the prevalence and risk of hip fracture. Migration can therefore have a positive effect on one aspect of the health of a population, and can influence and lower the total cost of healthcare due to reduced risk and prevalence of hip fracture.},
  author       = {Albin, Björn and Hjelm, Katarina and Elmståhl, Sölve},
  issn         = {1471-2474},
  language     = {eng},
  publisher    = {BioMed Central},
  series       = {BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders},
  title        = {Lower prevalence of hip fractures in foreign-born individuals than in Swedish-born individuals during the period 1987-1999},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2474-11-203},
  volume       = {11},
  year         = {2010},
}