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Post-dispersal seed predation of woody forest species limits recolonization of forest plantations on ex-arable land

Bruun, Hans Henrik LU ; Valtinat, Karin LU ; Kollmann, Johannes and Brunet, Jorg (2010) In Preslia 82(3). p.345-356
Abstract
Reforestation of ex-arable land in temperate regions increases the area of potential habitat for forest plants. However, the herbaceous plant layer of these plantations contains fewer forest species than comparable plantations at continuously forested sites. One of the reasons for this might be differences in recruitment. The present study addresses post-dispersal seed predation, mainly of woody plants, as the factor limiting the recolonization of young oak plantations in southern Sweden. Our objectives were to investigate differences in dispersal and post-dispersal seed predation between first-generation forest plantations on ex-arable land and re-planted clear-cuts on continuously forested land. There was no recruitment following the... (More)
Reforestation of ex-arable land in temperate regions increases the area of potential habitat for forest plants. However, the herbaceous plant layer of these plantations contains fewer forest species than comparable plantations at continuously forested sites. One of the reasons for this might be differences in recruitment. The present study addresses post-dispersal seed predation, mainly of woody plants, as the factor limiting the recolonization of young oak plantations in southern Sweden. Our objectives were to investigate differences in dispersal and post-dispersal seed predation between first-generation forest plantations on ex-arable land and re-planted clear-cuts on continuously forested land. There was no recruitment following the experimental sowing of six common woody species (Abuts glutinosa, Betula pendula, Frangula alnus, Sambucus nigra, Sorbus aucuparia and Sorbus intermedia). Thus, the colonization of forest plantations by native shrubs and trees appears to be habitat-limited; the only exception being Rhamnus catharticus, for which poor dispersal ability may be more important. Post-dispersal seed predation of forest shrubs and trees was marked, especially in relatively small and isolated plantations on ex-arable land. There was a high seed predation of Crataegus monogyna, Sorbus aucuparia and Viburnum opulus on ex-arable land, while that of Frangula alnus and Sambucus racemosa was not associated with site placement and land-use history. Seed predation is probably a more important factor limiting restoration of near-natural forests than previously thought. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
species richness, land-use history, limitation, habitat, forest restoration, deciduous forest, dispersal ability
in
Preslia
volume
82
issue
3
pages
345 - 356
publisher
Czech Botanical Society
external identifiers
  • wos:000281933600005
  • scopus:77958467212
ISSN
0032-7786
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
3e210b3a-84f7-4c39-9400-b45f23948bb6 (old id 1726380)
alternative location
http://www.ibot.cas.cz/preslia/P103Bruun.pdf
date added to LUP
2010-12-03 15:38:45
date last changed
2018-05-29 09:58:22
@article{3e210b3a-84f7-4c39-9400-b45f23948bb6,
  abstract     = {Reforestation of ex-arable land in temperate regions increases the area of potential habitat for forest plants. However, the herbaceous plant layer of these plantations contains fewer forest species than comparable plantations at continuously forested sites. One of the reasons for this might be differences in recruitment. The present study addresses post-dispersal seed predation, mainly of woody plants, as the factor limiting the recolonization of young oak plantations in southern Sweden. Our objectives were to investigate differences in dispersal and post-dispersal seed predation between first-generation forest plantations on ex-arable land and re-planted clear-cuts on continuously forested land. There was no recruitment following the experimental sowing of six common woody species (Abuts glutinosa, Betula pendula, Frangula alnus, Sambucus nigra, Sorbus aucuparia and Sorbus intermedia). Thus, the colonization of forest plantations by native shrubs and trees appears to be habitat-limited; the only exception being Rhamnus catharticus, for which poor dispersal ability may be more important. Post-dispersal seed predation of forest shrubs and trees was marked, especially in relatively small and isolated plantations on ex-arable land. There was a high seed predation of Crataegus monogyna, Sorbus aucuparia and Viburnum opulus on ex-arable land, while that of Frangula alnus and Sambucus racemosa was not associated with site placement and land-use history. Seed predation is probably a more important factor limiting restoration of near-natural forests than previously thought.},
  author       = {Bruun, Hans Henrik and Valtinat, Karin and Kollmann, Johannes and Brunet, Jorg},
  issn         = {0032-7786},
  keyword      = {species richness,land-use history,limitation,habitat,forest restoration,deciduous forest,dispersal ability},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {345--356},
  publisher    = {Czech Botanical Society},
  series       = {Preslia},
  title        = {Post-dispersal seed predation of woody forest species limits recolonization of forest plantations on ex-arable land},
  volume       = {82},
  year         = {2010},
}