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Virtual reality cataract surgery training: learning curves and concurrent validity.

Selvander, Madeleine LU and Åsman, Peter LU (2012) In Acta Ophthalmologica 90. p.412-417
Abstract
Purpose: To investigate initial learning curves on a virtual reality (VR) eye surgery simulator and whether achieved skills are transferable between tasks. Methods: Thirty-five medical students were randomized to complete ten iterations on either the VR Caspulorhexis module (group A) or the Cataract navigation training module (group B) and then two iterations on the other module. Learning curves were compared between groups. The second Capsulorhexis video was saved and evaluated with the performance rating tool Objective Structured Assessment of Cataract Surgical Skill (OSACSS). The students' stereoacuity was examined. Results: Both groups demonstrated significant improvements in performance over the 10 iterations: group A for all... (More)
Purpose: To investigate initial learning curves on a virtual reality (VR) eye surgery simulator and whether achieved skills are transferable between tasks. Methods: Thirty-five medical students were randomized to complete ten iterations on either the VR Caspulorhexis module (group A) or the Cataract navigation training module (group B) and then two iterations on the other module. Learning curves were compared between groups. The second Capsulorhexis video was saved and evaluated with the performance rating tool Objective Structured Assessment of Cataract Surgical Skill (OSACSS). The students' stereoacuity was examined. Results: Both groups demonstrated significant improvements in performance over the 10 iterations: group A for all parameters analysed including score (p < 0.0001), time (p < 0.0001) and corneal damage (p = 0.0003), group B for time (p < 0.0001), corneal damage (p < 0.0001) but not for score (p = 0.752). Training on one module did not improve performance on the other. Capsulorhexis score correlated significantly with evaluation of the videos using the OSACSS performance rating tool. For stereoacuity < and ≥120 seconds of arc, sum of both modules' second iteration score was 73.5 and 41.0, respectively (p = 0.062). Conclusion: An initial rapid improvement in performance on a simulator with repeated practice was shown. For capsulorhexis, 10 iterations with only simulator feedback are not enough to reach a plateau for overall score. Skills transfer between modules was not found suggesting benefits from training on both modules. Stereoacuity may be of importance in the recruitment and training of new cataract surgeons. Additional studies are needed to investigate this further. Concurrent validity was found for Capsulorhexis module. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
SoTL
categories
Higher Education
in
Acta Ophthalmologica
volume
90
pages
412 - 417
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • wos:000306903600022
  • pmid:21054818
  • scopus:84864401193
ISSN
1755-3768
DOI
10.1111/j.1755-3768.2010.02028.x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
94cf0d9a-8a69-41ee-8f0e-3065228acc63 (old id 1732227)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21054818?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2010-12-01 10:47:13
date last changed
2017-10-01 04:56:34
@article{94cf0d9a-8a69-41ee-8f0e-3065228acc63,
  abstract     = {Purpose: To investigate initial learning curves on a virtual reality (VR) eye surgery simulator and whether achieved skills are transferable between tasks. Methods: Thirty-five medical students were randomized to complete ten iterations on either the VR Caspulorhexis module (group A) or the Cataract navigation training module (group B) and then two iterations on the other module. Learning curves were compared between groups. The second Capsulorhexis video was saved and evaluated with the performance rating tool Objective Structured Assessment of Cataract Surgical Skill (OSACSS). The students' stereoacuity was examined. Results: Both groups demonstrated significant improvements in performance over the 10 iterations: group A for all parameters analysed including score (p &lt; 0.0001), time (p &lt; 0.0001) and corneal damage (p = 0.0003), group B for time (p &lt; 0.0001), corneal damage (p &lt; 0.0001) but not for score (p = 0.752). Training on one module did not improve performance on the other. Capsulorhexis score correlated significantly with evaluation of the videos using the OSACSS performance rating tool. For stereoacuity &lt; and ≥120 seconds of arc, sum of both modules' second iteration score was 73.5 and 41.0, respectively (p = 0.062). Conclusion: An initial rapid improvement in performance on a simulator with repeated practice was shown. For capsulorhexis, 10 iterations with only simulator feedback are not enough to reach a plateau for overall score. Skills transfer between modules was not found suggesting benefits from training on both modules. Stereoacuity may be of importance in the recruitment and training of new cataract surgeons. Additional studies are needed to investigate this further. Concurrent validity was found for Capsulorhexis module.},
  author       = {Selvander, Madeleine and Åsman, Peter},
  issn         = {1755-3768},
  keyword      = {SoTL},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {412--417},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Acta Ophthalmologica},
  title        = {Virtual reality cataract surgery training: learning curves and concurrent validity.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1755-3768.2010.02028.x},
  volume       = {90},
  year         = {2012},
}