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MHC genotype and male ornamentation: Genetic evidence for the Hamilton-Zuk model

von Schantz, Torbjörn LU ; Wittzell, Håkan LU ; Göransson, Görgen; Grahn, Mats LU and Persson, Kerstin LU (1996) In Royal Society of London. Proceedings B. Biological Sciences 263(1368). p.265-271
Abstract
The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is an immunologically important cluster of highly variable genes that is known to affect fitness in domesticated mammals and birds. Spur length of male pheasants in southern Sweden correlates with male viability, female mate choice, and offspring survival rate. Here we show by genetic analyses that the MHC genotype is associated with variation in both male spur length and male viability. These are the first data that directly support a 'good genes' hypothesis by Hamilton and Zuk predicting that females discriminate among males on the basis of secondary sexual characters in order to pass on genes for disease resistance that improve fitness in their offspring.
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
branta-leucopsis, barnacle goose, sexual selection, preferences, mating, phasianus-colchicus, major histocompatibility complex, evolution, viability, pheasant, haplotypes
in
Royal Society of London. Proceedings B. Biological Sciences
volume
263
issue
1368
pages
265 - 271
publisher
Royal Society
external identifiers
  • scopus:0029879967
ISSN
1471-2954
DOI
10.1098/rspb.1996.0041
project
Avian MHC genes
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
3393d18a-35ec-46f2-8e2e-b0f6409301ee (old id 1747854)
date added to LUP
2011-02-22 11:42:21
date last changed
2017-08-06 04:41:49
@article{3393d18a-35ec-46f2-8e2e-b0f6409301ee,
  abstract     = {The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is an immunologically important cluster of highly variable genes that is known to affect fitness in domesticated mammals and birds. Spur length of male pheasants in southern Sweden correlates with male viability, female mate choice, and offspring survival rate. Here we show by genetic analyses that the MHC genotype is associated with variation in both male spur length and male viability. These are the first data that directly support a 'good genes' hypothesis by Hamilton and Zuk predicting that females discriminate among males on the basis of secondary sexual characters in order to pass on genes for disease resistance that improve fitness in their offspring.},
  author       = {von Schantz, Torbjörn and Wittzell, Håkan and Göransson, Görgen and Grahn, Mats and Persson, Kerstin},
  issn         = {1471-2954},
  keyword      = {branta-leucopsis,barnacle goose,sexual selection,preferences,mating,phasianus-colchicus,major histocompatibility complex,evolution,viability,pheasant,haplotypes},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1368},
  pages        = {265--271},
  publisher    = {Royal Society},
  series       = {Royal Society of London. Proceedings B. Biological Sciences},
  title        = {MHC genotype and male ornamentation: Genetic evidence for the Hamilton-Zuk model},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1098/rspb.1996.0041},
  volume       = {263},
  year         = {1996},
}