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Preventable breast cancer is postmenopausal

Hemminki, Kari LU ; Försti, Asta LU ; Sundquist, Jan LU and Mousavi, Seyed Mohsen (2011) In Breast Cancer Research and Treatment 125(1). p.163-167
Abstract
Breast cancer incidence has markedly increased in Western countries for reasons that are not entirely understood. We characterized periodic and age-specific incidence trends of breast cancer in immigrants who migrated from low incidence areas to Sweden. The incidence in immigrants was compared to that in native Swedes and standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated, based on the Swedish Family-Cancer Database. Age-specific incidence data for low and high incidence populations were obtained from Cancer Incidence in Five Continents IX and NORDCAN. For immigrants from the seven lowest countries/regions 535 breast cancers were identified; the SIRs ranging from 0.45 for Turkish to 0.70 for Greek women. The SIR increased somewhat with... (More)
Breast cancer incidence has markedly increased in Western countries for reasons that are not entirely understood. We characterized periodic and age-specific incidence trends of breast cancer in immigrants who migrated from low incidence areas to Sweden. The incidence in immigrants was compared to that in native Swedes and standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated, based on the Swedish Family-Cancer Database. Age-specific incidence data for low and high incidence populations were obtained from Cancer Incidence in Five Continents IX and NORDCAN. For immigrants from the seven lowest countries/regions 535 breast cancers were identified; the SIRs ranging from 0.45 for Turkish to 0.70 for Greek women. The SIR increased somewhat with the length of stay in Sweden, from 0.55 for stay between 0 and 10 years to 0.59 for a stay of 20+ years. The age-specific incidence curves for these immigrants were superimposable upon the earliest Swedish (year 1960) or Danish (1943) rates. These rates differed from the current Swedish rates by a much lower postmenopausal component. Large incidence differences were also observed between white Californians and immigrants from China and Korea. Our results show that the main difference between high and low incidence areas is in postmenopausal cancer which has increased preferentially during the past century. Immigrants from low risk areas to Sweden show age-specific incidence patterns of Swedes half a century ago. These differences offer opportunities for the identification of factors underlying breast cancer etiology and tools for prevention. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Environmental effect, Risk factors, Ethnic differences, Age-incidence, Incidence change
in
Breast Cancer Research and Treatment
volume
125
issue
1
pages
163 - 167
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • wos:000284956400018
  • scopus:78651089129
ISSN
1573-7217
DOI
10.1007/s10549-010-0926-8
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
aedf0945-1ec5-458e-9250-4e1d9f9d9fca (old id 1774221)
date added to LUP
2011-02-01 09:57:43
date last changed
2017-05-28 04:12:24
@article{aedf0945-1ec5-458e-9250-4e1d9f9d9fca,
  abstract     = {Breast cancer incidence has markedly increased in Western countries for reasons that are not entirely understood. We characterized periodic and age-specific incidence trends of breast cancer in immigrants who migrated from low incidence areas to Sweden. The incidence in immigrants was compared to that in native Swedes and standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated, based on the Swedish Family-Cancer Database. Age-specific incidence data for low and high incidence populations were obtained from Cancer Incidence in Five Continents IX and NORDCAN. For immigrants from the seven lowest countries/regions 535 breast cancers were identified; the SIRs ranging from 0.45 for Turkish to 0.70 for Greek women. The SIR increased somewhat with the length of stay in Sweden, from 0.55 for stay between 0 and 10 years to 0.59 for a stay of 20+ years. The age-specific incidence curves for these immigrants were superimposable upon the earliest Swedish (year 1960) or Danish (1943) rates. These rates differed from the current Swedish rates by a much lower postmenopausal component. Large incidence differences were also observed between white Californians and immigrants from China and Korea. Our results show that the main difference between high and low incidence areas is in postmenopausal cancer which has increased preferentially during the past century. Immigrants from low risk areas to Sweden show age-specific incidence patterns of Swedes half a century ago. These differences offer opportunities for the identification of factors underlying breast cancer etiology and tools for prevention.},
  author       = {Hemminki, Kari and Försti, Asta and Sundquist, Jan and Mousavi, Seyed Mohsen},
  issn         = {1573-7217},
  keyword      = {Environmental effect,Risk factors,Ethnic differences,Age-incidence,Incidence change},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {163--167},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {Breast Cancer Research and Treatment},
  title        = {Preventable breast cancer is postmenopausal},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10549-010-0926-8},
  volume       = {125},
  year         = {2011},
}