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Bicycle-friendly infrastructure planning in Beijing and Copenhagen - between adapting design solutions and learning local planning cultures

Zhao, Chunli LU ; Carstensen, Trine Agervig ; Nielsen, Thomas Alexander Sick and Olafsson, Anton Stahl (2018) In Journal of Transport Geography 68. p.149-159
Abstract

Cities around the world are constructing bicycle infrastructure to increase cycling. However, identifying efficient design solutions and determining how bicycle infrastructure planning knowledge can be integrated into comprehensive policy remains a challenge. The objective of this paper is to shed light on the strengths and weaknesses of current bicycle infrastructure planning in both an experienced city, Copenhagen, and in a less experienced city, Beijing. The paper examines how local design solutions are identified, how efficient they are and to what extent bicycle infrastructure planning is supported by the local planning cultures. The study draws on the successful experience of Copenhagen to identify challenges to bicycle... (More)

Cities around the world are constructing bicycle infrastructure to increase cycling. However, identifying efficient design solutions and determining how bicycle infrastructure planning knowledge can be integrated into comprehensive policy remains a challenge. The objective of this paper is to shed light on the strengths and weaknesses of current bicycle infrastructure planning in both an experienced city, Copenhagen, and in a less experienced city, Beijing. The paper examines how local design solutions are identified, how efficient they are and to what extent bicycle infrastructure planning is supported by the local planning cultures. The study draws on the successful experience of Copenhagen to identify challenges to bicycle infrastructure planning in Beijing and to improve it based on lessons learnt. The study uses qualitative semi-structured data collected from 11 interviews with key planners. It employs the Dutch CROW principles to assess the efficiency of the bicycle infrastructure planning. The analysis of the role of the local planning culture is framed by the ‘culturized planning model’. The study finds that bicycle-friendly infrastructure planning could be strengthened in Beijing by integrating and applying all the CROW principles simultaneously. It concludes that Beijing can draw inspiration from Copenhagen by increasing the priority of cycling in both the planning and societal environment. The planning environment could be strengthened by professionalizing bicycle infrastructure planning and by aligning the prioritization of bicycle transport between policies. The societal environment could become more supportive by improving the status of the bicycle as a means of transport.

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publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
CROW principles, Learning, Planning environment, Planning knowledge and experience
in
Journal of Transport Geography
volume
68
pages
11 pages
publisher
Pergamon
external identifiers
  • scopus:85044605410
  • scopus:85044605410
ISSN
0966-6923
DOI
10.1016/j.jtrangeo.2018.03.003
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
184ad7b1-79fe-4106-948e-a1f830dda265
date added to LUP
2018-12-04 10:42:47
date last changed
2020-10-07 06:11:26
@article{184ad7b1-79fe-4106-948e-a1f830dda265,
  abstract     = {<p>Cities around the world are constructing bicycle infrastructure to increase cycling. However, identifying efficient design solutions and determining how bicycle infrastructure planning knowledge can be integrated into comprehensive policy remains a challenge. The objective of this paper is to shed light on the strengths and weaknesses of current bicycle infrastructure planning in both an experienced city, Copenhagen, and in a less experienced city, Beijing. The paper examines how local design solutions are identified, how efficient they are and to what extent bicycle infrastructure planning is supported by the local planning cultures. The study draws on the successful experience of Copenhagen to identify challenges to bicycle infrastructure planning in Beijing and to improve it based on lessons learnt. The study uses qualitative semi-structured data collected from 11 interviews with key planners. It employs the Dutch CROW principles to assess the efficiency of the bicycle infrastructure planning. The analysis of the role of the local planning culture is framed by the ‘culturized planning model’. The study finds that bicycle-friendly infrastructure planning could be strengthened in Beijing by integrating and applying all the CROW principles simultaneously. It concludes that Beijing can draw inspiration from Copenhagen by increasing the priority of cycling in both the planning and societal environment. The planning environment could be strengthened by professionalizing bicycle infrastructure planning and by aligning the prioritization of bicycle transport between policies. The societal environment could become more supportive by improving the status of the bicycle as a means of transport.</p>},
  author       = {Zhao, Chunli and Carstensen, Trine Agervig and Nielsen, Thomas Alexander Sick and Olafsson, Anton Stahl},
  issn         = {0966-6923},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {04},
  pages        = {149--159},
  publisher    = {Pergamon},
  series       = {Journal of Transport Geography},
  title        = {Bicycle-friendly infrastructure planning in Beijing and Copenhagen - between adapting design solutions and learning local planning cultures},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jtrangeo.2018.03.003},
  doi          = {10.1016/j.jtrangeo.2018.03.003},
  volume       = {68},
  year         = {2018},
}