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Obstetric outcome after in vitro fertilization with single or double embryo transfer

Sazonova, Antonina; Källén, Karin LU ; Thurin-Kjellberg, Ann; Wennerholm, Ulla-Britt and Bergh, Christina (2011) In Human Reproduction 26(2). p.442-450
Abstract
BACKGROUND: IVF children, including singletons, are known to have a poorer obstetric outcome than children born after spontaneous conception. With a broad introduction of single embryo transfer (SET), this scenario might change. This study compares the obstetric outcome after IVF with SET, elective SET (eSET), non elective SET (non-eSET) and double embryo transfer (DET) with outcomes in the general population. METHODS: All IVF children born in Sweden after IVF treatment during the years 2002-2006 (n = 13 544 children) were included and compared with all non-IVF children born during the same time period (n 587 009 children). Data were collected from all 16 Swedish IVF clinics and cross-linked with the Swedish Medical Birth Registry. Main... (More)
BACKGROUND: IVF children, including singletons, are known to have a poorer obstetric outcome than children born after spontaneous conception. With a broad introduction of single embryo transfer (SET), this scenario might change. This study compares the obstetric outcome after IVF with SET, elective SET (eSET), non elective SET (non-eSET) and double embryo transfer (DET) with outcomes in the general population. METHODS: All IVF children born in Sweden after IVF treatment during the years 2002-2006 (n = 13 544 children) were included and compared with all non-IVF children born during the same time period (n 587 009 children). Data were collected from all 16 Swedish IVF clinics and cross-linked with the Swedish Medical Birth Registry. Main outcomes were preterm birth (< 28, < 32 and < 37 w), very-low-birthweight (VLBW) and low-birthweight (LBW). Adjusted odds ratios were calculated. RESULTS: In total, 7763 children were born after SET and 5724 children after DET. Comparing all SET children, irrespective of multiplicity, with all children in the general population, significantly higher rates of,28 w was found for the IVF children. Comparing IVF singletons, irrespective of SET and DET with non-IVF singletons from the general population, significantly higher rates of < 28 w, < 37 w, LBW and VLBW were found. eSET singletons, compared with singletons in the general population, had a significantly higher rate of < 37 w and non-eSET singletons had significantly higher rates of < 28 w and < 2500 g births. CONCLUSIONS: Children born after IVF had a poorer obstetric outcome compared with children from the general population. Singletons, when analysed as one group, irrespective of whether the children were born after eSET, non-eSET or DET, also had a poorer obstetric outcome with higher rates of preterm and LBW compared with singletons in the general population. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
in vitro fertilization, single embryo transfer, children outcome, maternal outcome, obstetric outcome
in
Human Reproduction
volume
26
issue
2
pages
442 - 450
publisher
Oxford University Press
external identifiers
  • wos:000286470500023
  • scopus:79251481466
ISSN
0268-1161
DOI
10.1093/humrep/deq325
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
55840440-a0a4-4d00-98db-98fffd4b3b2c (old id 1869287)
date added to LUP
2011-04-04 09:16:14
date last changed
2017-11-05 03:12:17
@article{55840440-a0a4-4d00-98db-98fffd4b3b2c,
  abstract     = {BACKGROUND: IVF children, including singletons, are known to have a poorer obstetric outcome than children born after spontaneous conception. With a broad introduction of single embryo transfer (SET), this scenario might change. This study compares the obstetric outcome after IVF with SET, elective SET (eSET), non elective SET (non-eSET) and double embryo transfer (DET) with outcomes in the general population. METHODS: All IVF children born in Sweden after IVF treatment during the years 2002-2006 (n = 13 544 children) were included and compared with all non-IVF children born during the same time period (n 587 009 children). Data were collected from all 16 Swedish IVF clinics and cross-linked with the Swedish Medical Birth Registry. Main outcomes were preterm birth (&lt; 28, &lt; 32 and &lt; 37 w), very-low-birthweight (VLBW) and low-birthweight (LBW). Adjusted odds ratios were calculated. RESULTS: In total, 7763 children were born after SET and 5724 children after DET. Comparing all SET children, irrespective of multiplicity, with all children in the general population, significantly higher rates of,28 w was found for the IVF children. Comparing IVF singletons, irrespective of SET and DET with non-IVF singletons from the general population, significantly higher rates of &lt; 28 w, &lt; 37 w, LBW and VLBW were found. eSET singletons, compared with singletons in the general population, had a significantly higher rate of &lt; 37 w and non-eSET singletons had significantly higher rates of &lt; 28 w and &lt; 2500 g births. CONCLUSIONS: Children born after IVF had a poorer obstetric outcome compared with children from the general population. Singletons, when analysed as one group, irrespective of whether the children were born after eSET, non-eSET or DET, also had a poorer obstetric outcome with higher rates of preterm and LBW compared with singletons in the general population.},
  author       = {Sazonova, Antonina and Källén, Karin and Thurin-Kjellberg, Ann and Wennerholm, Ulla-Britt and Bergh, Christina},
  issn         = {0268-1161},
  keyword      = {in vitro fertilization,single embryo transfer,children outcome,maternal outcome,obstetric outcome},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {442--450},
  publisher    = {Oxford University Press},
  series       = {Human Reproduction},
  title        = {Obstetric outcome after in vitro fertilization with single or double embryo transfer},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/humrep/deq325},
  volume       = {26},
  year         = {2011},
}