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A Quick Test of cognitive speed is sensitive in detecting early treatment response in Alzheimer's disease

Palmqvist, Sebastian LU ; Minthon, Lennart LU ; Wattmo, Carina LU ; Londos, Elisabet LU and Hansson, Oskar LU (2010) In Alzheimer’s Research & Therapy 2(5).
Abstract
Introduction

There is a great need for quick tests that identify treatment response in Alzheimer's disease (AD) to determine who benefits from the treatment. In this study, A Quick Test of cognitive speed (AQT) was compared with the mini-mental state examination (MMSE) in the evaluation of treatment outcome in AD.



Methods

75 patients with mild to moderate AD at a memory clinic were assessed with AQT and the MMSE at a pretreatment visit, at baseline and after 8 weeks of treatment with cholinesterase inhibitors (ChEI) initiated at baseline. Changes in the mean test scores before and after treatment were compared, as well as the number of treatment responders detected by each test, according to a reliable... (More)
Introduction

There is a great need for quick tests that identify treatment response in Alzheimer's disease (AD) to determine who benefits from the treatment. In this study, A Quick Test of cognitive speed (AQT) was compared with the mini-mental state examination (MMSE) in the evaluation of treatment outcome in AD.



Methods

75 patients with mild to moderate AD at a memory clinic were assessed with AQT and the MMSE at a pretreatment visit, at baseline and after 8 weeks of treatment with cholinesterase inhibitors (ChEI) initiated at baseline. Changes in the mean test scores before and after treatment were compared, as well as the number of treatment responders detected by each test, according to a reliable change index (RCI).



Results

After 8 weeks of treatment, the AQT improvement, expressed as a percentage, was significantly greater than that of the MMSE (P = 0.026). According to the RCI, the cut-offs to define a responder were ≥16 seconds improvement on AQT and ≥3 points on the MMSE after 8 weeks. With these cut-offs, both tests falsely classified ≤5% as responders during the pretreatment period. After 8 weeks of treatment, AQT detected significantly more responders than the MMSE (34% compared with 17%; P = 0.024). After 6 months of treatment, the 8-week AQT responders still showed a significantly better treatment response than the AQT nonresponders (22.3 seconds in mean difference; P < 0.001).



Conclusions

AQT detects twice as many treatment responders as the MMSE. It seems that AQT can, already after 8 weeks, identify the AD patients who will continue to benefit from ChEI treatment. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Alzheimer’s disease Treatment evaluation Cognitive tests Cholinesterase inhibitors
in
Alzheimer’s Research & Therapy
volume
2
issue
5
publisher
BioMed Central
external identifiers
  • scopus:77957924111
DOI
10.1186/alzrt53
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
134ea1a8-ce4e-4440-b812-149d191f7160 (old id 1936561)
date added to LUP
2013-02-07 11:59:37
date last changed
2017-08-13 04:44:40
@article{134ea1a8-ce4e-4440-b812-149d191f7160,
  abstract     = {Introduction<br/><br>
There is a great need for quick tests that identify treatment response in Alzheimer's disease (AD) to determine who benefits from the treatment. In this study, A Quick Test of cognitive speed (AQT) was compared with the mini-mental state examination (MMSE) in the evaluation of treatment outcome in AD.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Methods<br/><br>
75 patients with mild to moderate AD at a memory clinic were assessed with AQT and the MMSE at a pretreatment visit, at baseline and after 8 weeks of treatment with cholinesterase inhibitors (ChEI) initiated at baseline. Changes in the mean test scores before and after treatment were compared, as well as the number of treatment responders detected by each test, according to a reliable change index (RCI).<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Results<br/><br>
After 8 weeks of treatment, the AQT improvement, expressed as a percentage, was significantly greater than that of the MMSE (P = 0.026). According to the RCI, the cut-offs to define a responder were ≥16 seconds improvement on AQT and ≥3 points on the MMSE after 8 weeks. With these cut-offs, both tests falsely classified ≤5% as responders during the pretreatment period. After 8 weeks of treatment, AQT detected significantly more responders than the MMSE (34% compared with 17%; P = 0.024). After 6 months of treatment, the 8-week AQT responders still showed a significantly better treatment response than the AQT nonresponders (22.3 seconds in mean difference; P &lt; 0.001).<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Conclusions<br/><br>
AQT detects twice as many treatment responders as the MMSE. It seems that AQT can, already after 8 weeks, identify the AD patients who will continue to benefit from ChEI treatment.},
  articleno    = {29},
  author       = {Palmqvist, Sebastian and Minthon, Lennart and Wattmo, Carina and Londos, Elisabet and Hansson, Oskar},
  keyword      = {Alzheimer’s disease Treatment evaluation Cognitive tests Cholinesterase inhibitors},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  publisher    = {BioMed Central},
  series       = {Alzheimer’s Research & Therapy},
  title        = {A Quick Test of cognitive speed is sensitive in detecting early treatment response in Alzheimer's disease},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/alzrt53},
  volume       = {2},
  year         = {2010},
}