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Family caregivers' assessment of symptoms in persons with dementia using the GBS-scale: differences in rating after psychosocial intervention - an 18-month follow-up study.

Dahlrup, Beth LU ; Nordell, Eva LU ; Andrén, Signe LU and Elmståhl, Sölve LU (2011) In Clinical Interventions in Aging 6. p.9-18
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to examine if psychosocial intervention for family caregivers made any differences in describing symptoms of dementia in the persons they cared for. The study population comprised family caregivers of persons aged 70 years and older receiving social services and diagnosed with dementia disorders. A group of 129 family caregivers underwent psychosocial intervention including education, information, and provision of a support group, while 133 family caregivers did not and these formed the control group. Family caregivers were followed-up every 6 months for a total of 18 months. They rated intellectual, emotional, and activity of daily living (ADL) functions in persons with dementia using the... (More)
The purpose of this study was to examine if psychosocial intervention for family caregivers made any differences in describing symptoms of dementia in the persons they cared for. The study population comprised family caregivers of persons aged 70 years and older receiving social services and diagnosed with dementia disorders. A group of 129 family caregivers underwent psychosocial intervention including education, information, and provision of a support group, while 133 family caregivers did not and these formed the control group. Family caregivers were followed-up every 6 months for a total of 18 months. They rated intellectual, emotional, and activity of daily living (ADL) functions in persons with dementia using the Gottfries-Bråne-Steen scale (GBS-scale). Family caregivers who underwent psychosocial intervention rated the intellectual and emotional symptoms of dementia significantly higher 6 months later compared to controls and the effect was sustained during the 18-month follow-up irrespective of relationship and education. Most notably, decrease in function of recent memory, ability to increase tempo, long-windedness, distractibility, and blunting were better identified. Our findings suggest that the family caregivers who underwent psychosocial intervention achieved better understanding of different symptoms and the behaviors of dementia. These findings may explain earlier findings of positive effects after psychosocial intervention on family caregivers' sense of burden, satisfaction, and ability to delay nursing home placement. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Clinical Interventions in Aging
volume
6
pages
9 - 18
publisher
Dove Medical Press Ltd.
external identifiers
  • wos:000299337200002
  • pmid:21472087
  • scopus:80051628759
ISSN
1178-1998
DOI
10.2147/CIA.S14237
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
564677e5-bc9b-4995-b5b7-94890fef945d (old id 1937380)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21472087?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2011-05-02 11:07:25
date last changed
2017-04-09 04:28:15
@article{564677e5-bc9b-4995-b5b7-94890fef945d,
  abstract     = {The purpose of this study was to examine if psychosocial intervention for family caregivers made any differences in describing symptoms of dementia in the persons they cared for. The study population comprised family caregivers of persons aged 70 years and older receiving social services and diagnosed with dementia disorders. A group of 129 family caregivers underwent psychosocial intervention including education, information, and provision of a support group, while 133 family caregivers did not and these formed the control group. Family caregivers were followed-up every 6 months for a total of 18 months. They rated intellectual, emotional, and activity of daily living (ADL) functions in persons with dementia using the Gottfries-Bråne-Steen scale (GBS-scale). Family caregivers who underwent psychosocial intervention rated the intellectual and emotional symptoms of dementia significantly higher 6 months later compared to controls and the effect was sustained during the 18-month follow-up irrespective of relationship and education. Most notably, decrease in function of recent memory, ability to increase tempo, long-windedness, distractibility, and blunting were better identified. Our findings suggest that the family caregivers who underwent psychosocial intervention achieved better understanding of different symptoms and the behaviors of dementia. These findings may explain earlier findings of positive effects after psychosocial intervention on family caregivers' sense of burden, satisfaction, and ability to delay nursing home placement.},
  author       = {Dahlrup, Beth and Nordell, Eva and Andrén, Signe and Elmståhl, Sölve},
  issn         = {1178-1998},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {9--18},
  publisher    = {Dove Medical Press Ltd.},
  series       = {Clinical Interventions in Aging},
  title        = {Family caregivers' assessment of symptoms in persons with dementia using the GBS-scale: differences in rating after psychosocial intervention - an 18-month follow-up study.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/CIA.S14237},
  volume       = {6},
  year         = {2011},
}