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Risk of incident and fatal melanoma in individuals with a family history of incident or fatal melanoma or any cancer.

Brandt, Andreas LU ; Sundquist, Jan LU and Hemminki, Kari LU (2011) In British Journal of Dermatology 165. p.342-348
Abstract
Background: A family history of melanoma is associated with an increased risk of melanoma and probably of other, discordant cancers. Limited data are available on familial mortality in melanoma. If fatal forms of melanoma were associated with fatal forms of melanoma or of some other cancers, only studies on familial mortality rather than on familial incidence might be able to detect them. Furthermore, estimates on familial aggregation based on mortality are free from bias of overdiagnosis. Objectives: The aim of this study was the estimation of familial aggregation of concordant melanoma and of melanoma and any other cancers both based on incidence and mortality. Methods: We used the nation-wide Swedish Family-Cancer Database to calculate... (More)
Background: A family history of melanoma is associated with an increased risk of melanoma and probably of other, discordant cancers. Limited data are available on familial mortality in melanoma. If fatal forms of melanoma were associated with fatal forms of melanoma or of some other cancers, only studies on familial mortality rather than on familial incidence might be able to detect them. Furthermore, estimates on familial aggregation based on mortality are free from bias of overdiagnosis. Objectives: The aim of this study was the estimation of familial aggregation of concordant melanoma and of melanoma and any other cancers both based on incidence and mortality. Methods: We used the nation-wide Swedish Family-Cancer Database to calculate standardized incidence ratios (SIR) for incident melanoma for relatives of any cancer patients and standardized mortality ratios (SMR) for death in melanoma for relatives of individuals who died from any other cancer. Similar risks were determined for any common cancer when relatives were affected by melanoma. Results: For concordant melanoma, familial incidence equalled familial mortality, SIR=SMR. Familial clustering (SIRs increased) of melanoma and esophageal, colorectal, breast, prostate, kidney, nervous system and connective tissue cancers and myeloma and leukaemia was observed. The SMRs for pancreatic and nervous system cancers were increased in relatives whose parents had died from melanoma. Conclusions: These data should encourage search for fatal subtypes of familial cancer, which may eventually have clinical implications. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
British Journal of Dermatology
volume
165
pages
342 - 348
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • wos:000292926900018
  • pmid:21457213
  • scopus:79960637237
ISSN
1365-2133
DOI
10.1111/j.1365-2133.2011.10350.x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
b093b712-8873-4508-9705-91a70bdef3ac (old id 1937634)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21457213?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2011-05-02 09:06:05
date last changed
2017-10-22 04:54:20
@article{b093b712-8873-4508-9705-91a70bdef3ac,
  abstract     = {Background: A family history of melanoma is associated with an increased risk of melanoma and probably of other, discordant cancers. Limited data are available on familial mortality in melanoma. If fatal forms of melanoma were associated with fatal forms of melanoma or of some other cancers, only studies on familial mortality rather than on familial incidence might be able to detect them. Furthermore, estimates on familial aggregation based on mortality are free from bias of overdiagnosis. Objectives: The aim of this study was the estimation of familial aggregation of concordant melanoma and of melanoma and any other cancers both based on incidence and mortality. Methods: We used the nation-wide Swedish Family-Cancer Database to calculate standardized incidence ratios (SIR) for incident melanoma for relatives of any cancer patients and standardized mortality ratios (SMR) for death in melanoma for relatives of individuals who died from any other cancer. Similar risks were determined for any common cancer when relatives were affected by melanoma. Results: For concordant melanoma, familial incidence equalled familial mortality, SIR=SMR. Familial clustering (SIRs increased) of melanoma and esophageal, colorectal, breast, prostate, kidney, nervous system and connective tissue cancers and myeloma and leukaemia was observed. The SMRs for pancreatic and nervous system cancers were increased in relatives whose parents had died from melanoma. Conclusions: These data should encourage search for fatal subtypes of familial cancer, which may eventually have clinical implications.},
  author       = {Brandt, Andreas and Sundquist, Jan and Hemminki, Kari},
  issn         = {1365-2133},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {342--348},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {British Journal of Dermatology},
  title        = {Risk of incident and fatal melanoma in individuals with a family history of incident or fatal melanoma or any cancer.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2133.2011.10350.x},
  volume       = {165},
  year         = {2011},
}