Advanced

Incretin Hormone and Insulin Responses to Oral Versus Intravenous Lipid Administration in Humans.

Lindgren, Ola LU ; Carr, Richard D; Deacon, Carolyn F; Holst, Jens J; Pacini, Giovanni; Mari, Andrea and Ahrén, Bo LU (2011) In The Journal of clinical endocrinology and metabolism 96. p.2519-2524
Abstract
Context: The incretin effect is responsible for the higher insulin response to oral glucose than to iv glucose at matching glucose levels. It is not known whether this effect is restricted to glucose only. Objective: The aim of the study was to examine whether insulin and incretin hormone responses are higher after oral vs. iv challenge of a lipid emulsion with matching triglyceride levels in humans. Design, Settings, and Participants: A lipid emulsion (Intralipid) was administered orally (3 ml/kg) or iv (variable infusion rates to match triglyceride levels after oral ingestion) in healthy lean males (n = 12) at a University Clinical Research Unit. Samples were collected during 300 min. Main Outcome Measures: We measured the suprabasal... (More)
Context: The incretin effect is responsible for the higher insulin response to oral glucose than to iv glucose at matching glucose levels. It is not known whether this effect is restricted to glucose only. Objective: The aim of the study was to examine whether insulin and incretin hormone responses are higher after oral vs. iv challenge of a lipid emulsion with matching triglyceride levels in humans. Design, Settings, and Participants: A lipid emulsion (Intralipid) was administered orally (3 ml/kg) or iv (variable infusion rates to match triglyceride levels after oral ingestion) in healthy lean males (n = 12) at a University Clinical Research Unit. Samples were collected during 300 min. Main Outcome Measures: We measured the suprabasal area under the curve for insulin, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), and the insulin secretory rate based on C-peptide levels by deconvolution. Results: Triglyceride levels increased similarly after oral and iv lipid; also, glucose and free fatty acid levels were similar in the two tests. Oral lipid elicited a clear insulin and C-peptide response, whereas no insulin or C-peptide responses were observed during iv lipid. Total and intact GIP and GLP-1 levels both increased after oral lipid administration but were not significantly altered after iv lipid. Conclusions: At matching triglyceride levels and with no difference in glucose and free fatty acid levels, oral lipid ingestion but not iv lipid infusion elicits a clear insulin response in association with increased GIP and GLP-1 concentrations. This may suggest that the incretin hormones also contribute to the islet response to noncarbohydrate nutrients. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
The Journal of clinical endocrinology and metabolism
volume
96
pages
2519 - 2524
publisher
The Endocrine Society
external identifiers
  • wos:000293516400053
  • pmid:21593115
  • scopus:79961244091
ISSN
1945-7197
DOI
10.1210/jc.2011-0266
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
d60f2a75-48c3-4d93-bc36-8771ec79d9ac (old id 1972354)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21593115?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2011-06-07 21:25:39
date last changed
2017-03-26 04:28:41
@article{d60f2a75-48c3-4d93-bc36-8771ec79d9ac,
  abstract     = {Context: The incretin effect is responsible for the higher insulin response to oral glucose than to iv glucose at matching glucose levels. It is not known whether this effect is restricted to glucose only. Objective: The aim of the study was to examine whether insulin and incretin hormone responses are higher after oral vs. iv challenge of a lipid emulsion with matching triglyceride levels in humans. Design, Settings, and Participants: A lipid emulsion (Intralipid) was administered orally (3 ml/kg) or iv (variable infusion rates to match triglyceride levels after oral ingestion) in healthy lean males (n = 12) at a University Clinical Research Unit. Samples were collected during 300 min. Main Outcome Measures: We measured the suprabasal area under the curve for insulin, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), and the insulin secretory rate based on C-peptide levels by deconvolution. Results: Triglyceride levels increased similarly after oral and iv lipid; also, glucose and free fatty acid levels were similar in the two tests. Oral lipid elicited a clear insulin and C-peptide response, whereas no insulin or C-peptide responses were observed during iv lipid. Total and intact GIP and GLP-1 levels both increased after oral lipid administration but were not significantly altered after iv lipid. Conclusions: At matching triglyceride levels and with no difference in glucose and free fatty acid levels, oral lipid ingestion but not iv lipid infusion elicits a clear insulin response in association with increased GIP and GLP-1 concentrations. This may suggest that the incretin hormones also contribute to the islet response to noncarbohydrate nutrients.},
  author       = {Lindgren, Ola and Carr, Richard D and Deacon, Carolyn F and Holst, Jens J and Pacini, Giovanni and Mari, Andrea and Ahrén, Bo},
  issn         = {1945-7197},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {2519--2524},
  publisher    = {The Endocrine Society},
  series       = {The Journal of clinical endocrinology and metabolism},
  title        = {Incretin Hormone and Insulin Responses to Oral Versus Intravenous Lipid Administration in Humans.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1210/jc.2011-0266},
  volume       = {96},
  year         = {2011},
}