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Parallel evolution of the make-accumulate-consume strategy in Saccharomyces and Dekkera yeasts.

Rozpedowska, Elzbieta LU ; Hellborg, Linda LU ; Ishchuk, Olena LU ; Orhan, Furkan LU ; Galafassi, Silvia; Merico, Annamaria; Woolfit, Megan; Compagno, Concetta and Piskur, Jure LU (2011) In Nature Communications 2.
Abstract
Saccharomyces yeasts degrade sugars to two-carbon components, in particular ethanol, even in the presence of excess oxygen. This characteristic is called the Crabtree effect and is the background for the 'make-accumulate-consume' life strategy, which in natural habitats helps Saccharomyces yeasts to out-compete other microorganisms. A global promoter rewiring in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae lineage, which occurred around 100 mya, was one of the main molecular events providing the background for evolution of this strategy. Here we show that the Dekkera bruxellensis lineage, which separated from the Saccharomyces yeasts more than 200 mya, also efficiently makes, accumulates and consumes ethanol and acetic acid. Analysis of promoter sequences... (More)
Saccharomyces yeasts degrade sugars to two-carbon components, in particular ethanol, even in the presence of excess oxygen. This characteristic is called the Crabtree effect and is the background for the 'make-accumulate-consume' life strategy, which in natural habitats helps Saccharomyces yeasts to out-compete other microorganisms. A global promoter rewiring in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae lineage, which occurred around 100 mya, was one of the main molecular events providing the background for evolution of this strategy. Here we show that the Dekkera bruxellensis lineage, which separated from the Saccharomyces yeasts more than 200 mya, also efficiently makes, accumulates and consumes ethanol and acetic acid. Analysis of promoter sequences indicates that both lineages independently underwent a massive loss of a specific cis-regulatory element from dozens of genes associated with respiration, and we show that also in D. bruxellensis this promoter rewiring contributes to the observed Crabtree effect. (Less)
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organization
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Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Nature Communications
volume
2
publisher
Nature Publishing Group
external identifiers
  • wos:000294802600007
  • pmid:21556056
  • scopus:79955879462
ISSN
2041-1723
DOI
10.1038/ncomms1305
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
b9c17078-3cee-4ca5-a927-ee25c18b0200 (old id 1973019)
date added to LUP
2011-08-17 11:45:54
date last changed
2017-10-01 04:04:47
@article{b9c17078-3cee-4ca5-a927-ee25c18b0200,
  abstract     = {Saccharomyces yeasts degrade sugars to two-carbon components, in particular ethanol, even in the presence of excess oxygen. This characteristic is called the Crabtree effect and is the background for the 'make-accumulate-consume' life strategy, which in natural habitats helps Saccharomyces yeasts to out-compete other microorganisms. A global promoter rewiring in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae lineage, which occurred around 100 mya, was one of the main molecular events providing the background for evolution of this strategy. Here we show that the Dekkera bruxellensis lineage, which separated from the Saccharomyces yeasts more than 200 mya, also efficiently makes, accumulates and consumes ethanol and acetic acid. Analysis of promoter sequences indicates that both lineages independently underwent a massive loss of a specific cis-regulatory element from dozens of genes associated with respiration, and we show that also in D. bruxellensis this promoter rewiring contributes to the observed Crabtree effect.},
  articleno    = {302},
  author       = {Rozpedowska, Elzbieta and Hellborg, Linda and Ishchuk, Olena and Orhan, Furkan and Galafassi, Silvia and Merico, Annamaria and Woolfit, Megan and Compagno, Concetta and Piskur, Jure},
  issn         = {2041-1723},
  language     = {eng},
  publisher    = {Nature Publishing Group},
  series       = {Nature Communications},
  title        = {Parallel evolution of the make-accumulate-consume strategy in Saccharomyces and Dekkera yeasts.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ncomms1305},
  volume       = {2},
  year         = {2011},
}