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Incidence of celiac disease among second-generation immigrants and adoptees from abroad in Sweden: evidence for ethnic differences in susceptibility.

Ji, Jianguang LU ; Ludvigsson, Jonas F; Sundquist, Kristina LU ; Sundquist, Jan LU and Hemminki, Kari LU (2011) In Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology 46. p.844-848
Abstract
Abstract Background and aims. The incidence of celiac disease (CD) shows large, worldwide variation. However, whether its causes are environmental (gluten-containing diet) or genetic (specific haplotype) have not been established. The aim of the present study is to examine the incidence of CD among second-generation immigrants and adoptees from abroad to disentangle genetic/ethnic versus environmental influences (assuming that immigrants have similar gluten exposures to native Swedes, and thus differ from them only in terms of their genetic background). Methods. Second-generation immigrants and adoptees from abroad were identified in the MigMed 2 Database and were followed until diagnosis of CD, death, or the end of study. Standardized... (More)
Abstract Background and aims. The incidence of celiac disease (CD) shows large, worldwide variation. However, whether its causes are environmental (gluten-containing diet) or genetic (specific haplotype) have not been established. The aim of the present study is to examine the incidence of CD among second-generation immigrants and adoptees from abroad to disentangle genetic/ethnic versus environmental influences (assuming that immigrants have similar gluten exposures to native Swedes, and thus differ from them only in terms of their genetic background). Methods. Second-generation immigrants and adoptees from abroad were identified in the MigMed 2 Database and were followed until diagnosis of CD, death, or the end of study. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated among these immigrants with native Swedes as the reference group. Results. A total of 1,050,569 children were defined as second-generation immigrants and the overall SIR of CD (SIR = 0.89, 95% confidence interval 0.84-0.94) was significantly lower than that of native Swedes. The incidence of CD among children with parents from Western, Eastern, and Northern European countries was similar to that in native Swedes, but was lower for those with parents from low-prevalence countries, especially Eastern and Southeast Asian countries. A total of 51,557 children born in foreign countries were adopted by Swedes. Adoptees from Eastern Asia had a significantly decreased SIR of CD. Conclusions. The decreased incidence of CD in second-generation immigrants and some groups of adoptees from abroad strongly suggests that ethnic genetic heterogeneity may contribute to the worldwide variation in CD incidence. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology
volume
46
pages
844 - 848
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • wos:000292646800011
  • pmid:21529249
  • scopus:79960254246
ISSN
1502-7708
DOI
10.3109/00365521.2011.579999
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
2f59b5da-3173-4c7a-9b92-9b4edae43c24 (old id 1973352)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21529249?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2011-06-07 09:19:06
date last changed
2017-10-01 05:05:56
@article{2f59b5da-3173-4c7a-9b92-9b4edae43c24,
  abstract     = {Abstract Background and aims. The incidence of celiac disease (CD) shows large, worldwide variation. However, whether its causes are environmental (gluten-containing diet) or genetic (specific haplotype) have not been established. The aim of the present study is to examine the incidence of CD among second-generation immigrants and adoptees from abroad to disentangle genetic/ethnic versus environmental influences (assuming that immigrants have similar gluten exposures to native Swedes, and thus differ from them only in terms of their genetic background). Methods. Second-generation immigrants and adoptees from abroad were identified in the MigMed 2 Database and were followed until diagnosis of CD, death, or the end of study. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated among these immigrants with native Swedes as the reference group. Results. A total of 1,050,569 children were defined as second-generation immigrants and the overall SIR of CD (SIR = 0.89, 95% confidence interval 0.84-0.94) was significantly lower than that of native Swedes. The incidence of CD among children with parents from Western, Eastern, and Northern European countries was similar to that in native Swedes, but was lower for those with parents from low-prevalence countries, especially Eastern and Southeast Asian countries. A total of 51,557 children born in foreign countries were adopted by Swedes. Adoptees from Eastern Asia had a significantly decreased SIR of CD. Conclusions. The decreased incidence of CD in second-generation immigrants and some groups of adoptees from abroad strongly suggests that ethnic genetic heterogeneity may contribute to the worldwide variation in CD incidence.},
  author       = {Ji, Jianguang and Ludvigsson, Jonas F and Sundquist, Kristina and Sundquist, Jan and Hemminki, Kari},
  issn         = {1502-7708},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {844--848},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology},
  title        = {Incidence of celiac disease among second-generation immigrants and adoptees from abroad in Sweden: evidence for ethnic differences in susceptibility.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/00365521.2011.579999},
  volume       = {46},
  year         = {2011},
}