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Separation of dispersed substances and galactoglucomannan in thermomechanical pulp process water by microfiltration

Krawczyk, Holger LU and Jönsson, Ann-Sofi LU (2011) In Separation and Purification Technology 79(1). p.43-49
Abstract
Several valuable substances are released from wood during the production of thermomechanical pulp. These substances can be isolated and purified for use as value-added chemicals. The hemicellulose galactoglucomannan (GGM) has attracted a great deal of interest because of its possible applications as an oxygen barrier film in packaging materials, as a hydrogel in biomedical products and as an emulsion stabilizer in food and feed. In order to exploit GGM in pulp mill process water, it must be recovered at a high concentration and high purity. The first step in the purification process is the separation of GGM and dispersed substances. In this work, the influence of membrane pore size, cross-flow velocity and backpulsing on membrane... (More)
Several valuable substances are released from wood during the production of thermomechanical pulp. These substances can be isolated and purified for use as value-added chemicals. The hemicellulose galactoglucomannan (GGM) has attracted a great deal of interest because of its possible applications as an oxygen barrier film in packaging materials, as a hydrogel in biomedical products and as an emulsion stabilizer in food and feed. In order to exploit GGM in pulp mill process water, it must be recovered at a high concentration and high purity. The first step in the purification process is the separation of GGM and dispersed substances. In this work, the influence of membrane pore size, cross-flow velocity and backpulsing on membrane performance during the microfiltration of thermomechanical pulp process water was investigated. The flux of 0.4 and 0.8 mu m membranes was lower than the flux of a 0.2 mu m membrane, and it was not possible to recover the pure water flux of the 0.4 and 0.8 mu m membranes. Increased cross-flow velocity and backpulsing had a positive effect on the flux, but only a minor influence on the retention. The mean molecular mass of GGM in the process water was 9 kg/mol. The retention was therefore expected to be <10%. However, the retention of GGM was >50%, irrespective of the operating conditions. (C) 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Thermomechanical pulp, Hemicelluloses, Galactoglucomannan, Lignin, Microfiltration
in
Separation and Purification Technology
volume
79
issue
1
pages
43 - 49
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000291421200007
  • scopus:79955616003
ISSN
1873-3794
DOI
10.1016/j.seppur.2011.03.009
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
b62e1b67-9a1f-4c4b-8454-4d4edd4ca219 (old id 1984709)
date added to LUP
2011-07-08 15:47:40
date last changed
2017-10-22 03:12:05
@article{b62e1b67-9a1f-4c4b-8454-4d4edd4ca219,
  abstract     = {Several valuable substances are released from wood during the production of thermomechanical pulp. These substances can be isolated and purified for use as value-added chemicals. The hemicellulose galactoglucomannan (GGM) has attracted a great deal of interest because of its possible applications as an oxygen barrier film in packaging materials, as a hydrogel in biomedical products and as an emulsion stabilizer in food and feed. In order to exploit GGM in pulp mill process water, it must be recovered at a high concentration and high purity. The first step in the purification process is the separation of GGM and dispersed substances. In this work, the influence of membrane pore size, cross-flow velocity and backpulsing on membrane performance during the microfiltration of thermomechanical pulp process water was investigated. The flux of 0.4 and 0.8 mu m membranes was lower than the flux of a 0.2 mu m membrane, and it was not possible to recover the pure water flux of the 0.4 and 0.8 mu m membranes. Increased cross-flow velocity and backpulsing had a positive effect on the flux, but only a minor influence on the retention. The mean molecular mass of GGM in the process water was 9 kg/mol. The retention was therefore expected to be &lt;10%. However, the retention of GGM was &gt;50%, irrespective of the operating conditions. (C) 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.},
  author       = {Krawczyk, Holger and Jönsson, Ann-Sofi},
  issn         = {1873-3794},
  keyword      = {Thermomechanical pulp,Hemicelluloses,Galactoglucomannan,Lignin,Microfiltration},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {43--49},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Separation and Purification Technology},
  title        = {Separation of dispersed substances and galactoglucomannan in thermomechanical pulp process water by microfiltration},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.seppur.2011.03.009},
  volume       = {79},
  year         = {2011},
}