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Structured feedback to undergraduate medical students: 3 years' experience of an assessment tool.

Haffling, Ann-Christin LU ; Beckman, Anders LU and Edgren, Gudrun LU (2011) In Medical Teacher 33(7). p.349-357
Abstract
Background: There is a paucity of research on the effects of interactive feedback methods and sustained assessment strategies in formative assessment of students in the workplace. Aims: To investigate the outcome of long-term use of an assessment tool. Methods: Retrospective analysis of summarised assessment tools from 3 years of 464 final-year students in general practice. Quantitative data were analysed using non-parametric tests and a multi-level approach. Qualitative data were subjected to content analysis. Results: Students' main deficiencies in the consultation were in the domains of working diagnoses and management plans; however, supervisors emphasised goals of patient-centred communication and structure of the medical interview.... (More)
Background: There is a paucity of research on the effects of interactive feedback methods and sustained assessment strategies in formative assessment of students in the workplace. Aims: To investigate the outcome of long-term use of an assessment tool. Methods: Retrospective analysis of summarised assessment tools from 3 years of 464 final-year students in general practice. Quantitative data were analysed using non-parametric tests and a multi-level approach. Qualitative data were subjected to content analysis. Results: Students' main deficiencies in the consultation were in the domains of working diagnoses and management plans; however, supervisors emphasised goals of patient-centred communication and structure of the medical interview. As a group, students underestimated their clinical performance, compared to supervisors' judgement. Most students were supplied with specific goals, 58% with specific follow-up feedback. The majority of students and supervisors were satisfied with the assessment strategy. Long-term experience with the tool significantly increased the proportion of specific goals and feedback to students, supervisors' stringency of the assessment, and their satisfaction with the tool. Conclusions: The summarised assessment strategy proved feasible and acceptable with students and supervisors in a continuous attachment with assigned personal supervisors. However, there was room for improvement in supervisors' provision of specific follow-up feedback. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Medical Teacher
volume
33
issue
7
pages
349 - 357
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • wos:000291946700001
  • pmid:21696267
  • scopus:79959492529
ISSN
0142-159X
DOI
10.3109/0142159X.2011.577466
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
330af47e-6779-43aa-83cb-7826b9a1896f (old id 2007858)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21696267?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2011-07-06 10:27:10
date last changed
2017-03-26 04:27:11
@article{330af47e-6779-43aa-83cb-7826b9a1896f,
  abstract     = {Background: There is a paucity of research on the effects of interactive feedback methods and sustained assessment strategies in formative assessment of students in the workplace. Aims: To investigate the outcome of long-term use of an assessment tool. Methods: Retrospective analysis of summarised assessment tools from 3 years of 464 final-year students in general practice. Quantitative data were analysed using non-parametric tests and a multi-level approach. Qualitative data were subjected to content analysis. Results: Students' main deficiencies in the consultation were in the domains of working diagnoses and management plans; however, supervisors emphasised goals of patient-centred communication and structure of the medical interview. As a group, students underestimated their clinical performance, compared to supervisors' judgement. Most students were supplied with specific goals, 58% with specific follow-up feedback. The majority of students and supervisors were satisfied with the assessment strategy. Long-term experience with the tool significantly increased the proportion of specific goals and feedback to students, supervisors' stringency of the assessment, and their satisfaction with the tool. Conclusions: The summarised assessment strategy proved feasible and acceptable with students and supervisors in a continuous attachment with assigned personal supervisors. However, there was room for improvement in supervisors' provision of specific follow-up feedback.},
  author       = {Haffling, Ann-Christin and Beckman, Anders and Edgren, Gudrun},
  issn         = {0142-159X},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {7},
  pages        = {349--357},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Medical Teacher},
  title        = {Structured feedback to undergraduate medical students: 3 years' experience of an assessment tool.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/0142159X.2011.577466},
  volume       = {33},
  year         = {2011},
}