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Familiar transmission of coronary heart disease: A cohort study of 80,214 Swedish adoptees linked to their biological and adoptive parents.

Sundquist, Kristina LU ; Winkleby, Marilyn LU ; Li, Xinjun LU ; Ji, Jianguang LU ; Hemminki, Kari LU and Sundquist, Jan LU (2011) In American Heart Journal 162(2). p.317-323
Abstract
BACKGROUND:

Studies of adoptees have the potential to disentangle the contributions of genetic versus family environmental factors in the familiar transmission of coronary heart disease (CHD) because adoptees do not share the same family environment as their biological parents. The aims of this study were as follows: (1) to examine the risk of CHD in adopted men and women with at least one biological parent with CHD and (2) to examine the risk of CHD in adopted men and women with at least one adoptive parent with CHD.



METHODS:

The Swedish Multigenerational register was used to follow all Swedish-born adoptees (born in or after 1932, n = 80,214) between January 1, 1973, and December 31, 2008, for CHD.... (More)
BACKGROUND:

Studies of adoptees have the potential to disentangle the contributions of genetic versus family environmental factors in the familiar transmission of coronary heart disease (CHD) because adoptees do not share the same family environment as their biological parents. The aims of this study were as follows: (1) to examine the risk of CHD in adopted men and women with at least one biological parent with CHD and (2) to examine the risk of CHD in adopted men and women with at least one adoptive parent with CHD.



METHODS:

The Swedish Multigenerational register was used to follow all Swedish-born adoptees (born in or after 1932, n = 80,214) between January 1, 1973, and December 31, 2008, for CHD. The risk of CHD was estimated in adopted men and women with at least one biological parent with CHD and adopted men and women with at least one adoptive parent with CHD. The control groups consisted of adopted men or women without a biological parent with CHD or adopted men or women without an adoptive parent with CHD.



RESULTS:

Adopted men and women with at least one biological parent with CHD (n = 749) were 1.4 to 1.6 times (statistically significant, 95% CI) more likely to have CHD than adoptees without a biological parent with CHD. In contrast, men and women with at least one adoptive parent with CHD (n = 1,009) were not at increased risk of the disease.



CONCLUSIONS:

These findings (based on validated hospital diagnoses unbiased by recall) suggest that the familiar transmission of CHD from parents to offspring is more related to genetic factors than to family environmental factors. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
American Heart Journal
volume
162
issue
2
pages
317 - 323
publisher
Mosby
external identifiers
  • wos:000293729400015
  • pmid:21835293
  • scopus:80051672006
ISSN
1097-6744
DOI
10.1016/j.ahj.2011.05.013
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
4de2a9db-cbca-42d9-8bd6-5165f8f5b69a (old id 2151168)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21835293?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2011-09-04 21:39:28
date last changed
2017-01-01 03:47:55
@article{4de2a9db-cbca-42d9-8bd6-5165f8f5b69a,
  abstract     = {BACKGROUND:<br/><br>
Studies of adoptees have the potential to disentangle the contributions of genetic versus family environmental factors in the familiar transmission of coronary heart disease (CHD) because adoptees do not share the same family environment as their biological parents. The aims of this study were as follows: (1) to examine the risk of CHD in adopted men and women with at least one biological parent with CHD and (2) to examine the risk of CHD in adopted men and women with at least one adoptive parent with CHD.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
METHODS:<br/><br>
The Swedish Multigenerational register was used to follow all Swedish-born adoptees (born in or after 1932, n = 80,214) between January 1, 1973, and December 31, 2008, for CHD. The risk of CHD was estimated in adopted men and women with at least one biological parent with CHD and adopted men and women with at least one adoptive parent with CHD. The control groups consisted of adopted men or women without a biological parent with CHD or adopted men or women without an adoptive parent with CHD.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
RESULTS:<br/><br>
Adopted men and women with at least one biological parent with CHD (n = 749) were 1.4 to 1.6 times (statistically significant, 95% CI) more likely to have CHD than adoptees without a biological parent with CHD. In contrast, men and women with at least one adoptive parent with CHD (n = 1,009) were not at increased risk of the disease.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
CONCLUSIONS:<br/><br>
These findings (based on validated hospital diagnoses unbiased by recall) suggest that the familiar transmission of CHD from parents to offspring is more related to genetic factors than to family environmental factors.},
  author       = {Sundquist, Kristina and Winkleby, Marilyn and Li, Xinjun and Ji, Jianguang and Hemminki, Kari and Sundquist, Jan},
  issn         = {1097-6744},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {317--323},
  publisher    = {Mosby},
  series       = {American Heart Journal},
  title        = {Familiar transmission of coronary heart disease: A cohort study of 80,214 Swedish adoptees linked to their biological and adoptive parents.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ahj.2011.05.013},
  volume       = {162},
  year         = {2011},
}