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How Do Teachers With Self-Reported Voice Problems Differ From Their Peers With Self-Reported Voice Health?

Lyberg Åhlander, Viveka LU ; Rydell, Roland LU and Löfqvist, Anders LU (2012) In Journal of voice : official journal of the Voice Foundation 26(4). p.149-161
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: This randomized case-control study compares teachers with self-reported voice problems to age-, gender-, and school-matched colleagues with self-reported voice health. The self-assessed voice function is related to factors known to influence the voice: laryngeal findings, voice quality, personality, psychosocial and coping aspects, searching for causative factors of voice problems in teachers. METHODS: Subjects and controls, recruited from a teacher group in an earlier questionnaire study, underwent examinations of the larynx by high-speed imaging and kymograms; voice recordings; voice range profile; audiometry; self-assessment of voice handicap and voice function; teaching and environmental aspects; personality; coping;... (More)
OBJECTIVES: This randomized case-control study compares teachers with self-reported voice problems to age-, gender-, and school-matched colleagues with self-reported voice health. The self-assessed voice function is related to factors known to influence the voice: laryngeal findings, voice quality, personality, psychosocial and coping aspects, searching for causative factors of voice problems in teachers. METHODS: Subjects and controls, recruited from a teacher group in an earlier questionnaire study, underwent examinations of the larynx by high-speed imaging and kymograms; voice recordings; voice range profile; audiometry; self-assessment of voice handicap and voice function; teaching and environmental aspects; personality; coping; burnout, and work-related issues. The laryngeal and voice recordings were assessed by experienced phoniatricians and speech pathologists. RESULTS: The subjects with self-assessed voice problems differed from their peers with self-assessed voice health by significantly longer recovery time from voice problems and scored higher on all subscales of the Voice Handicap Index-Throat. CONCLUSIONS: The results show that the cause of voice dysfunction in this group of teachers with self-reported voice problems is not found in the vocal apparatus or within the individual. The individual's perception of a voice problem seems to be based on a combination of the number of symptoms and of how often the symptoms occur, along with the recovery time. The results also underline the importance of using self-assessed reports of voice dysfunction. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of voice : official journal of the Voice Foundation
volume
26
issue
4
pages
149 - 161
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000305961500003
  • pmid:21889297
  • scopus:84863186316
ISSN
1557-8658
DOI
10.1016/j.jvoice.2011.06.005
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
241bdc86-301b-4903-9f32-1b1e948e45cc (old id 2169155)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21889297?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2011-10-03 09:34:58
date last changed
2017-09-17 06:02:08
@article{241bdc86-301b-4903-9f32-1b1e948e45cc,
  abstract     = {OBJECTIVES: This randomized case-control study compares teachers with self-reported voice problems to age-, gender-, and school-matched colleagues with self-reported voice health. The self-assessed voice function is related to factors known to influence the voice: laryngeal findings, voice quality, personality, psychosocial and coping aspects, searching for causative factors of voice problems in teachers. METHODS: Subjects and controls, recruited from a teacher group in an earlier questionnaire study, underwent examinations of the larynx by high-speed imaging and kymograms; voice recordings; voice range profile; audiometry; self-assessment of voice handicap and voice function; teaching and environmental aspects; personality; coping; burnout, and work-related issues. The laryngeal and voice recordings were assessed by experienced phoniatricians and speech pathologists. RESULTS: The subjects with self-assessed voice problems differed from their peers with self-assessed voice health by significantly longer recovery time from voice problems and scored higher on all subscales of the Voice Handicap Index-Throat. CONCLUSIONS: The results show that the cause of voice dysfunction in this group of teachers with self-reported voice problems is not found in the vocal apparatus or within the individual. The individual's perception of a voice problem seems to be based on a combination of the number of symptoms and of how often the symptoms occur, along with the recovery time. The results also underline the importance of using self-assessed reports of voice dysfunction.},
  author       = {Lyberg Åhlander, Viveka and Rydell, Roland and Löfqvist, Anders},
  issn         = {1557-8658},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {149--161},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Journal of voice : official journal of the Voice Foundation},
  title        = {How Do Teachers With Self-Reported Voice Problems Differ From Their Peers With Self-Reported Voice Health?},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jvoice.2011.06.005},
  volume       = {26},
  year         = {2012},
}