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Linking landscape history and dispersal traits in grassland plant communities

Purschke, Oliver LU ; Sykes, Martin LU ; Reitalu, Triin LU ; Poschlod, Peter and Prentice, Honor C LU (2012) In Oecologia 168(3). p.773-783
Abstract
Dispersal limitation and long-term persistence

are known to delay plant species’ responses to habitat

fragmentation, but it is still unclear to what extent landscape

history may explain the distribution of dispersal traits

in present-day plant communities. We used quantitative

data on long-distance seed dispersal potential by wind and

grazing cattle (epi- and endozoochory), and on persistence

(adult plant longevity and seed bank persistence) to quantify

the linkages between dispersal and persistence traits in

grassland plant communities and current and past landscape

configurations. The long-distance dispersal potential

of present-day... (More)
Dispersal limitation and long-term persistence

are known to delay plant species’ responses to habitat

fragmentation, but it is still unclear to what extent landscape

history may explain the distribution of dispersal traits

in present-day plant communities. We used quantitative

data on long-distance seed dispersal potential by wind and

grazing cattle (epi- and endozoochory), and on persistence

(adult plant longevity and seed bank persistence) to quantify

the linkages between dispersal and persistence traits in

grassland plant communities and current and past landscape

configurations. The long-distance dispersal potential

of present-day communities was positively associated with

the amounts of grassland in the historical (1835, 1938)

landscape, and with a long continuity of grazing management—

but was not associated with the properties of the

current landscape. The study emphasises the role of history

as a determinant of the dispersal potential of present-day

grassland plant communities. The importance of long-distance

dispersal processes has declined in the increasingly

fragmented modern landscape, and long-term persistent

species are expected to play a more dominant role in

grassland communities in the future. However, even within

highly fragmented landscapes, long-distance dispersed

species may persist locally—delaying the repayment of the

extinction debt. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Life-history traits, Persistence, Fourth-corner, Habitat fragmentation, Land-use history
in
Oecologia
volume
168
issue
3
pages
773 - 783
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • wos:000301706800017
  • pmid:21956664
  • scopus:84856809848
ISSN
1432-1939
DOI
10.1007/s00442-011-2142-6
project
BECC
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
548ff633-6b11-4bd0-815b-8c3e3a0e1313 (old id 2174175)
date added to LUP
2011-10-17 12:55:03
date last changed
2017-05-14 03:19:14
@article{548ff633-6b11-4bd0-815b-8c3e3a0e1313,
  abstract     = {Dispersal limitation and long-term persistence<br/><br>
are known to delay plant species’ responses to habitat<br/><br>
fragmentation, but it is still unclear to what extent landscape<br/><br>
history may explain the distribution of dispersal traits<br/><br>
in present-day plant communities. We used quantitative<br/><br>
data on long-distance seed dispersal potential by wind and<br/><br>
grazing cattle (epi- and endozoochory), and on persistence<br/><br>
(adult plant longevity and seed bank persistence) to quantify<br/><br>
the linkages between dispersal and persistence traits in<br/><br>
grassland plant communities and current and past landscape<br/><br>
configurations. The long-distance dispersal potential<br/><br>
of present-day communities was positively associated with<br/><br>
the amounts of grassland in the historical (1835, 1938)<br/><br>
landscape, and with a long continuity of grazing management—<br/><br>
but was not associated with the properties of the<br/><br>
current landscape. The study emphasises the role of history<br/><br>
as a determinant of the dispersal potential of present-day<br/><br>
grassland plant communities. The importance of long-distance<br/><br>
dispersal processes has declined in the increasingly<br/><br>
fragmented modern landscape, and long-term persistent<br/><br>
species are expected to play a more dominant role in<br/><br>
grassland communities in the future. However, even within<br/><br>
highly fragmented landscapes, long-distance dispersed<br/><br>
species may persist locally—delaying the repayment of the<br/><br>
extinction debt.},
  author       = {Purschke, Oliver and Sykes, Martin and Reitalu, Triin and Poschlod, Peter and Prentice, Honor C},
  issn         = {1432-1939},
  keyword      = {Life-history traits,Persistence,Fourth-corner,Habitat fragmentation,Land-use history},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {773--783},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {Oecologia},
  title        = {Linking landscape history and dispersal traits in grassland plant communities},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00442-011-2142-6},
  volume       = {168},
  year         = {2012},
}