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Dissociative Disorders In DSM-5

Spiegel, David; Loewenstein, Richard J.; Lewis-Fernandez, Roberto; Sar, Vedat; Simeon, Daphne; Vermetten, Eric; Cardeña, Etzel LU and Dell, Paul F. (2011) In Depression and Anxiety 28(9). p.824-852
Abstract
Background: We present recommendations for revision of the diagnostic criteria for the Dissociative Disorders (DDs) for DSM-5. The periodic revision of the DSM provides an opportunity to revisit the assumptions underlying specific diagnoses and the empirical support, or lack of it, for the defining diagnostic criteria. Methods: This paper reviews clinical, phenomenological, epidemiological, cultural, and neurobiological data related to the DDs in order to generate an up-to-date, evidence-based set of DD diagnoses and diagnostic criteria for DSM-5. First, we review the definitions of dissociation and the differences between the definitions of dissociation and conceptualization of DDs in the DSM-IV-TR and the ICD-10, respectively. Also, we... (More)
Background: We present recommendations for revision of the diagnostic criteria for the Dissociative Disorders (DDs) for DSM-5. The periodic revision of the DSM provides an opportunity to revisit the assumptions underlying specific diagnoses and the empirical support, or lack of it, for the defining diagnostic criteria. Methods: This paper reviews clinical, phenomenological, epidemiological, cultural, and neurobiological data related to the DDs in order to generate an up-to-date, evidence-based set of DD diagnoses and diagnostic criteria for DSM-5. First, we review the definitions of dissociation and the differences between the definitions of dissociation and conceptualization of DDs in the DSM-IV-TR and the ICD-10, respectively. Also, we review more general conceptual issues in defining dissociation and dissociative disorders. Based on this review, we propose a revised definition of dissociation for DSM-5 and discuss the implications of this definition for understanding dissociative symptoms and disorders. Results: We make the following recommendations for DSM-5: 1. Depersonalization Disorder (DPD) should derealization symptoms as well. 2. Dissociative Fugue should become a subtype of Dissociative Amnesia (DA). 3. The diagnostic criteria for DID should be changed to emphasize the disruptive nature of the dissociation and amnesia for everyday as well as traumatic events. The experience of possession should be included in the definition of identity disruption. 4. Should Dissociative Trance Disorder should be included in the Unspecified Dissociative Disorder (UDD) category. Conclusions: There is a growing body of evidence linking the dissociative disorders to a trauma history, and to specific neural mechanisms. Depression and Anxiety 28:824-852, 2011. (C) 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
hypnosis, breast cancer, sleep, stress
in
Depression and Anxiety
volume
28
issue
9
pages
824 - 852
publisher
John Wiley & Sons
external identifiers
  • wos:000295105100008
  • scopus:80052738231
ISSN
1091-4269
DOI
10.1002/da.20874
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
bc191473-ce86-4c12-99a0-a368d4ac47a9 (old id 2179501)
date added to LUP
2011-11-01 07:51:30
date last changed
2017-10-22 03:12:08
@article{bc191473-ce86-4c12-99a0-a368d4ac47a9,
  abstract     = {Background: We present recommendations for revision of the diagnostic criteria for the Dissociative Disorders (DDs) for DSM-5. The periodic revision of the DSM provides an opportunity to revisit the assumptions underlying specific diagnoses and the empirical support, or lack of it, for the defining diagnostic criteria. Methods: This paper reviews clinical, phenomenological, epidemiological, cultural, and neurobiological data related to the DDs in order to generate an up-to-date, evidence-based set of DD diagnoses and diagnostic criteria for DSM-5. First, we review the definitions of dissociation and the differences between the definitions of dissociation and conceptualization of DDs in the DSM-IV-TR and the ICD-10, respectively. Also, we review more general conceptual issues in defining dissociation and dissociative disorders. Based on this review, we propose a revised definition of dissociation for DSM-5 and discuss the implications of this definition for understanding dissociative symptoms and disorders. Results: We make the following recommendations for DSM-5: 1. Depersonalization Disorder (DPD) should derealization symptoms as well. 2. Dissociative Fugue should become a subtype of Dissociative Amnesia (DA). 3. The diagnostic criteria for DID should be changed to emphasize the disruptive nature of the dissociation and amnesia for everyday as well as traumatic events. The experience of possession should be included in the definition of identity disruption. 4. Should Dissociative Trance Disorder should be included in the Unspecified Dissociative Disorder (UDD) category. Conclusions: There is a growing body of evidence linking the dissociative disorders to a trauma history, and to specific neural mechanisms. Depression and Anxiety 28:824-852, 2011. (C) 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.},
  author       = {Spiegel, David and Loewenstein, Richard J. and Lewis-Fernandez, Roberto and Sar, Vedat and Simeon, Daphne and Vermetten, Eric and Cardeña, Etzel and Dell, Paul F.},
  issn         = {1091-4269},
  keyword      = {hypnosis,breast cancer,sleep,stress},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {9},
  pages        = {824--852},
  publisher    = {John Wiley & Sons},
  series       = {Depression and Anxiety},
  title        = {Dissociative Disorders In DSM-5},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/da.20874},
  volume       = {28},
  year         = {2011},
}