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Failure to detect mismatches between intention and outcome in a simple decision task

Johansson, Petter LU ; Hall, Lars LU ; Sikström, Sverker LU and Olsson, A (2005) In Science 310(5745). p.116-119
Abstract
A fundamental assumption of theories of decision-making is that we detect mismatches between intention and outcome, adjust our behavior in the face of error, and adapt to changing circumstances. Is this always the case? We investigated the relation between intention, choice, and introspection. Participants made choices between presented face pairs on the basis of attractiveness, while we covertly manipulated the relationship between choice and outcome that they experienced. Participants failed to notice conspicuous mismatches between their intended choice and the outcome they were presented with, while nevertheless offering introspectively derived reasons for why they chose the way they did. We call this effect choice blindness.
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Science
volume
310
issue
5745
pages
116 - 119
publisher
The American Association for the Advancement of Science
external identifiers
  • wos:000232477000051
  • pmid:16210542
  • scopus:26444578366
ISSN
1095-9203
DOI
10.1126/science.1111709
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
c579a9b6-1b4a-4572-932e-0ff15f9832b4 (old id 220623)
date added to LUP
2007-08-13 12:56:47
date last changed
2017-11-05 04:25:40
@article{c579a9b6-1b4a-4572-932e-0ff15f9832b4,
  abstract     = {A fundamental assumption of theories of decision-making is that we detect mismatches between intention and outcome, adjust our behavior in the face of error, and adapt to changing circumstances. Is this always the case? We investigated the relation between intention, choice, and introspection. Participants made choices between presented face pairs on the basis of attractiveness, while we covertly manipulated the relationship between choice and outcome that they experienced. Participants failed to notice conspicuous mismatches between their intended choice and the outcome they were presented with, while nevertheless offering introspectively derived reasons for why they chose the way they did. We call this effect choice blindness.},
  author       = {Johansson, Petter and Hall, Lars and Sikström, Sverker and Olsson, A},
  issn         = {1095-9203},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5745},
  pages        = {116--119},
  publisher    = {The American Association for the Advancement of Science},
  series       = {Science},
  title        = {Failure to detect mismatches between intention and outcome in a simple decision task},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.1111709},
  volume       = {310},
  year         = {2005},
}