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Accounting for the dead in the longitudinal analysis of income-related health inequalities

Petrie, Dennis; Allanson, Paul and Gerdtham, Ulf LU (2011) In Journal of Health Economics 30(5). p.1113-1123
Abstract
This paper develops an accounting framework to consider the effect of deaths on the longitudinal analysis of income-related health inequalities. Ignoring deaths or using Inverse Probability Weights (IPWs) to re-weight the sample for mortality-related attrition can produce misleading results. Incorporating deaths into the longitudinal analysis of income-related health inequalities provides a more complete picture in terms of the evaluation of health changes in respect to socioeconomic status. We illustrate our work by investigating health mobility from 1999 till 2004 using the British Household Panel Survey (BHPS). We show that for Scottish males explicitly accounting for the dead rather than using IPWs to account for mortality-related... (More)
This paper develops an accounting framework to consider the effect of deaths on the longitudinal analysis of income-related health inequalities. Ignoring deaths or using Inverse Probability Weights (IPWs) to re-weight the sample for mortality-related attrition can produce misleading results. Incorporating deaths into the longitudinal analysis of income-related health inequalities provides a more complete picture in terms of the evaluation of health changes in respect to socioeconomic status. We illustrate our work by investigating health mobility from 1999 till 2004 using the British Household Panel Survey (BHPS). We show that for Scottish males explicitly accounting for the dead rather than using IPWs to account for mortality-related attrition changes the direction of the relationship between relative health changes and initial income position, from negative to positive, while for other groups it significantly increases the strength of the positive relationship. Incorporating the dead may be vital in the longitudinal analysis of health inequalities. (C) 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Mortality, Income-related health inequality, Mobility analysis, Longitudinal data, Inverse probability weights (IPWs)
in
Journal of Health Economics
volume
30
issue
5
pages
1113 - 1123
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000295707200023
  • scopus:80052858859
ISSN
1879-1646
DOI
10.1016/j.jhealeco.2011.07.004
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
255ec3a9-b81a-4884-aabc-3e30c1684351 (old id 2208227)
date added to LUP
2011-11-28 09:36:03
date last changed
2017-01-01 03:43:19
@article{255ec3a9-b81a-4884-aabc-3e30c1684351,
  abstract     = {This paper develops an accounting framework to consider the effect of deaths on the longitudinal analysis of income-related health inequalities. Ignoring deaths or using Inverse Probability Weights (IPWs) to re-weight the sample for mortality-related attrition can produce misleading results. Incorporating deaths into the longitudinal analysis of income-related health inequalities provides a more complete picture in terms of the evaluation of health changes in respect to socioeconomic status. We illustrate our work by investigating health mobility from 1999 till 2004 using the British Household Panel Survey (BHPS). We show that for Scottish males explicitly accounting for the dead rather than using IPWs to account for mortality-related attrition changes the direction of the relationship between relative health changes and initial income position, from negative to positive, while for other groups it significantly increases the strength of the positive relationship. Incorporating the dead may be vital in the longitudinal analysis of health inequalities. (C) 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.},
  author       = {Petrie, Dennis and Allanson, Paul and Gerdtham, Ulf},
  issn         = {1879-1646},
  keyword      = {Mortality,Income-related health inequality,Mobility analysis,Longitudinal data,Inverse probability weights (IPWs)},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {1113--1123},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Journal of Health Economics},
  title        = {Accounting for the dead in the longitudinal analysis of income-related health inequalities},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jhealeco.2011.07.004},
  volume       = {30},
  year         = {2011},
}