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Selective IgA Deficiency in Autoimmune Diseases

Wang, Ning; Shen, Nan; Vyse, Timothy J.; Anand, Vidya; Gunnarson, Iva; Sturfelt, Gunnar LU ; Rantapaa-Dahlqvist, Solbritt; Elvin, Kerstin; Truedsson, Lennart and Andersson, Bengt A., et al. (2011) In Molecular Medicine 17(11-12). p.1383-1396
Abstract
Selective immunoglobulin A deficiency (IgAD) is the most common primary immunodeficiency in Caucasians. It has previously been suggested to be associated with a variety of concomitant autoimmune diseases. In this review, we present data on the prevalence of IgAD in patients with Graves disease (GD), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), type 1 diabetes (T1D). celiac disease (CD), myasthenia gravis (MG) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) on the basis of both our own recent large-scale screening results and literature data. Genetic factors are important for the development of both IgAD and various autoimmune disorders, including GD, SLE, T1D, CD, MG and RA, and a strong association with the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region has been... (More)
Selective immunoglobulin A deficiency (IgAD) is the most common primary immunodeficiency in Caucasians. It has previously been suggested to be associated with a variety of concomitant autoimmune diseases. In this review, we present data on the prevalence of IgAD in patients with Graves disease (GD), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), type 1 diabetes (T1D). celiac disease (CD), myasthenia gravis (MG) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) on the basis of both our own recent large-scale screening results and literature data. Genetic factors are important for the development of both IgAD and various autoimmune disorders, including GD, SLE, T1D, CD, MG and RA, and a strong association with the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region has been reported. In addition, non-MHC genes, such as interferon-induced helicase 1 (IFH1) and c-type lectin domain family 16, member A (CLEC16A), are also associated with the development of IgAD and some of the above diseases. This indicates a possible common genetic background. In this review, we present suggestive evidence for a shared genetic predisposition between these disorders. (C) 2011 The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, www.feinsteininstitute.org Online address: hffp://www.molmed.org doi: 10.2119/molmed.2011.00195 (Less)
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Molecular Medicine
volume
17
issue
11-12
pages
1383 - 1396
publisher
The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research
external identifiers
  • wos:000297958800029
  • scopus:82855177895
ISSN
1528-3658
DOI
10.2119/molmed.2011.00195
language
English
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yes
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7f7a4b63-ff7b-4d81-955e-d8cafd556a5e (old id 2279255)
date added to LUP
2012-01-11 14:45:47
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2017-09-17 06:55:06
@article{7f7a4b63-ff7b-4d81-955e-d8cafd556a5e,
  abstract     = {Selective immunoglobulin A deficiency (IgAD) is the most common primary immunodeficiency in Caucasians. It has previously been suggested to be associated with a variety of concomitant autoimmune diseases. In this review, we present data on the prevalence of IgAD in patients with Graves disease (GD), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), type 1 diabetes (T1D). celiac disease (CD), myasthenia gravis (MG) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) on the basis of both our own recent large-scale screening results and literature data. Genetic factors are important for the development of both IgAD and various autoimmune disorders, including GD, SLE, T1D, CD, MG and RA, and a strong association with the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region has been reported. In addition, non-MHC genes, such as interferon-induced helicase 1 (IFH1) and c-type lectin domain family 16, member A (CLEC16A), are also associated with the development of IgAD and some of the above diseases. This indicates a possible common genetic background. In this review, we present suggestive evidence for a shared genetic predisposition between these disorders. (C) 2011 The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, www.feinsteininstitute.org Online address: hffp://www.molmed.org doi: 10.2119/molmed.2011.00195},
  author       = {Wang, Ning and Shen, Nan and Vyse, Timothy J. and Anand, Vidya and Gunnarson, Iva and Sturfelt, Gunnar and Rantapaa-Dahlqvist, Solbritt and Elvin, Kerstin and Truedsson, Lennart and Andersson, Bengt A. and Dahle, Charlotte and Ortqvist, Eva and Gregersen, Peter K. and Behrens, Timothy W. and Hammarstrom, Lennart},
  issn         = {1528-3658},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {11-12},
  pages        = {1383--1396},
  publisher    = {The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research},
  series       = {Molecular Medicine},
  title        = {Selective IgA Deficiency in Autoimmune Diseases},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.2119/molmed.2011.00195},
  volume       = {17},
  year         = {2011},
}