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Risk factors for cardiovascular disease and future osteoarthritis-related arthroplasty: a population-based cohort study in men and women from Malmo, Sweden

Kadam, U. T.; Holmberg, Anna H LU ; Blagojevic, M.; Nilsson, Peter LU and Åkesson, Kristina LU (2011) In Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology 40(6). p.478-485
Abstract
Objective: To investigate the hypothesis that cardiovascular risk factors increase the likelihood of future osteoarthritis (OA)-related arthroplasty in adult men and women. Methods: Baseline cohort data on cardiovascular risk factors [age, socio-economic class, family history, obesity, smoking, glucose, cholesterol, blood pressure, and early cardiovascular disease (CVD) history] were linked to clinical registers of OA-related arthroplasty data. The study included 8749 women and 14 821 men with up to a 30-year follow-up. Results: In women, higher cardiovascular risk groups were more likely to have an OA outcome compared to the lowest risk quartile group (trend p < 0.001). The estimates were as follows: second quartile risk: rate ratio... (More)
Objective: To investigate the hypothesis that cardiovascular risk factors increase the likelihood of future osteoarthritis (OA)-related arthroplasty in adult men and women. Methods: Baseline cohort data on cardiovascular risk factors [age, socio-economic class, family history, obesity, smoking, glucose, cholesterol, blood pressure, and early cardiovascular disease (CVD) history] were linked to clinical registers of OA-related arthroplasty data. The study included 8749 women and 14 821 men with up to a 30-year follow-up. Results: In women, higher cardiovascular risk groups were more likely to have an OA outcome compared to the lowest risk quartile group (trend p < 0.001). The estimates were as follows: second quartile risk: rate ratio (RR) 2.15, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.6-2.9, third quartile risk: 3.32 (2.5-4.5); and highest risk quartile: 3.47 (2.6-4.7). In men, higher cardiovascular risk groups were also more likely to have an OA outcome compared to the lowest risk quartile group (trend p = 0.001). The estimates were as follows: second quartile risk: RR 1.44, 95% CI 1.1-1.9; third quartile risk: 1.38 (1.1-1.8); and highest risk quartile: 1.67 (1.3-2.2). Conclusions: Our large cohort study with up to a 30-year follow-up period provides evidence to support the hypothesis of shared risk factors in CVD and OA, and the findings suggest an alternative aetiological process in the pathogenesis of OA. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology
volume
40
issue
6
pages
478 - 485
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • wos:000297852500012
  • scopus:83455259396
ISSN
1502-7732
DOI
10.3109/03009742.2011.585619
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
dcc0b9df-6dbe-4b96-a3f3-4ad044ea6b8c (old id 2279396)
date added to LUP
2012-01-11 13:59:05
date last changed
2017-07-02 03:04:11
@article{dcc0b9df-6dbe-4b96-a3f3-4ad044ea6b8c,
  abstract     = {Objective: To investigate the hypothesis that cardiovascular risk factors increase the likelihood of future osteoarthritis (OA)-related arthroplasty in adult men and women. Methods: Baseline cohort data on cardiovascular risk factors [age, socio-economic class, family history, obesity, smoking, glucose, cholesterol, blood pressure, and early cardiovascular disease (CVD) history] were linked to clinical registers of OA-related arthroplasty data. The study included 8749 women and 14 821 men with up to a 30-year follow-up. Results: In women, higher cardiovascular risk groups were more likely to have an OA outcome compared to the lowest risk quartile group (trend p &lt; 0.001). The estimates were as follows: second quartile risk: rate ratio (RR) 2.15, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.6-2.9, third quartile risk: 3.32 (2.5-4.5); and highest risk quartile: 3.47 (2.6-4.7). In men, higher cardiovascular risk groups were also more likely to have an OA outcome compared to the lowest risk quartile group (trend p = 0.001). The estimates were as follows: second quartile risk: RR 1.44, 95% CI 1.1-1.9; third quartile risk: 1.38 (1.1-1.8); and highest risk quartile: 1.67 (1.3-2.2). Conclusions: Our large cohort study with up to a 30-year follow-up period provides evidence to support the hypothesis of shared risk factors in CVD and OA, and the findings suggest an alternative aetiological process in the pathogenesis of OA.},
  author       = {Kadam, U. T. and Holmberg, Anna H and Blagojevic, M. and Nilsson, Peter and Åkesson, Kristina},
  issn         = {1502-7732},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {478--485},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology},
  title        = {Risk factors for cardiovascular disease and future osteoarthritis-related arthroplasty: a population-based cohort study in men and women from Malmo, Sweden},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/03009742.2011.585619},
  volume       = {40},
  year         = {2011},
}