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Artificial Redirection of Sensation From Prosthetic Fingers to the Phantom Hand Map on Transradial Amputees: Vibrotactile Versus Mechanotactile Sensory Feedback

Antfolk, Christian LU ; D'Alonzo, Marco; Controzzi, Marco; Lundborg, Göran LU ; Rosén, Birgitta LU ; Sebelius, Fredrik LU and Cipriani, Christian (2013) In IEEE Transactions on Neural Systems and Rehabilitation Engineering 21(1). p.112-120
Abstract
This work assesses the ability of transradial amputees to discriminate multi-site tactile stimuli in sensory discrimination tasks. It compares different sensory feedback modalities using an artificial hand prosthesis in: 1) a modality matched paradigm where pressure recorded on the five fingertips of the hand was fed back as pressure stimulation on five target points on the residual limb; and 2) a modality mismatched paradigm where the pressures were transformed into mechanical vibrations and fed back. Eight transradial amputees took part in the study and were divided in two groups based on the integrity of their phantom map; group A had a complete phantom map on the residual limb whereas group B had an incomplete or nonexisting map. The... (More)
This work assesses the ability of transradial amputees to discriminate multi-site tactile stimuli in sensory discrimination tasks. It compares different sensory feedback modalities using an artificial hand prosthesis in: 1) a modality matched paradigm where pressure recorded on the five fingertips of the hand was fed back as pressure stimulation on five target points on the residual limb; and 2) a modality mismatched paradigm where the pressures were transformed into mechanical vibrations and fed back. Eight transradial amputees took part in the study and were divided in two groups based on the integrity of their phantom map; group A had a complete phantom map on the residual limb whereas group B had an incomplete or nonexisting map. The ability in localizing stimuli was compared with that of 10 healthy subjects using the vibration feedback and 11 healthy subjects using the pressure feedback (in a previous study), on their forearms, in similar experiments. Results demonstrate that pressure stimulation surpassed vibrotactile stimulation in multi-site sensory feedback discrimination. Furthermore, we demonstrate that subjects with a detailed phantom map had the best discrimination performance and even surpassed healthy participants for both feedback paradigms whereas group B had the worst performance overall. Finally, we show that placement of feedback devices on a complete phantom map improves multi-site sensory feedback discrimination, independently of the feedback modality. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Prosthetic hand, sensory feedback, transradial amputee
in
IEEE Transactions on Neural Systems and Rehabilitation Engineering
volume
21
issue
1
pages
112 - 120
publisher
IEEE--Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.
external identifiers
  • wos:000313423200014
  • scopus:84871981621
ISSN
1534-4320
DOI
10.1109/TNSRE.2012.2217989
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
22c6b6b9-b275-4617-ba19-44c74f11ad96 (old id 3470659)
date added to LUP
2013-02-21 14:44:45
date last changed
2018-07-22 03:51:52
@article{22c6b6b9-b275-4617-ba19-44c74f11ad96,
  abstract     = {This work assesses the ability of transradial amputees to discriminate multi-site tactile stimuli in sensory discrimination tasks. It compares different sensory feedback modalities using an artificial hand prosthesis in: 1) a modality matched paradigm where pressure recorded on the five fingertips of the hand was fed back as pressure stimulation on five target points on the residual limb; and 2) a modality mismatched paradigm where the pressures were transformed into mechanical vibrations and fed back. Eight transradial amputees took part in the study and were divided in two groups based on the integrity of their phantom map; group A had a complete phantom map on the residual limb whereas group B had an incomplete or nonexisting map. The ability in localizing stimuli was compared with that of 10 healthy subjects using the vibration feedback and 11 healthy subjects using the pressure feedback (in a previous study), on their forearms, in similar experiments. Results demonstrate that pressure stimulation surpassed vibrotactile stimulation in multi-site sensory feedback discrimination. Furthermore, we demonstrate that subjects with a detailed phantom map had the best discrimination performance and even surpassed healthy participants for both feedback paradigms whereas group B had the worst performance overall. Finally, we show that placement of feedback devices on a complete phantom map improves multi-site sensory feedback discrimination, independently of the feedback modality.},
  author       = {Antfolk, Christian and D'Alonzo, Marco and Controzzi, Marco and Lundborg, Göran and Rosén, Birgitta and Sebelius, Fredrik and Cipriani, Christian},
  issn         = {1534-4320},
  keyword      = {Prosthetic hand,sensory feedback,transradial amputee},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {112--120},
  publisher    = {IEEE--Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.},
  series       = {IEEE Transactions on Neural Systems and Rehabilitation Engineering},
  title        = {Artificial Redirection of Sensation From Prosthetic Fingers to the Phantom Hand Map on Transradial Amputees: Vibrotactile Versus Mechanotactile Sensory Feedback},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/TNSRE.2012.2217989},
  volume       = {21},
  year         = {2013},
}