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Quality of care for the dying across different levels of palliative care development : A population-based cohort study

Schelin, Maria Ec LU ; Sallerfors, Bengt LU ; Rasmussen, Birgit H. LU and Fürst, Carl Johan LU (2018) In Palliative Medicine 32(10). p.1596-1604
Abstract

BACKGROUND:: There is a lack of knowledge about how the provision and availability of specialized palliative care relates to the quality of dying in hospital and community-based settings. AIM:: We aimed to explore the quality of care during last week of life in relation to different levels of palliative care development. DESIGN:: We investigated access to palliative care in Southern Sweden, where one region offers palliative care in accordance with European Association for Palliative Care guidelines for capacity, and the other region offers less developed palliative care. Data on approximately 12,000 deaths during 2015 were collected from the Swedish Register of Palliative Care. The quality of care was investigated by region, and was... (More)

BACKGROUND:: There is a lack of knowledge about how the provision and availability of specialized palliative care relates to the quality of dying in hospital and community-based settings. AIM:: We aimed to explore the quality of care during last week of life in relation to different levels of palliative care development. DESIGN:: We investigated access to palliative care in Southern Sweden, where one region offers palliative care in accordance with European Association for Palliative Care guidelines for capacity, and the other region offers less developed palliative care. Data on approximately 12,000 deaths during 2015 were collected from the Swedish Register of Palliative Care. The quality of care was investigated by region, and was measured in terms of assessment of oral health and of pain, and end-of-life conversation, companionship at death and artificial nutrition/fluid in the last 24 h. RESULTS:: The overall quality of care during last week of life was not consistently better in the region with fully developed palliative care compared with the less developed region. In fact, for patients dying in hospitals and community-based settings, the quality was statistically significantly better in the less developed region. The small proportion of patients who had access to specialized palliative care had superior quality of care during the last week of life as compared to patients in other care settings. CONCLUSION:: The capacity of specialized palliative care does not per se influence the quality of care during the last week of life for patients in other settings.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Palliative care, population, quality of care
in
Palliative Medicine
volume
32
issue
10
pages
9 pages
publisher
SAGE Publications Inc.
external identifiers
  • scopus:85056418945
ISSN
1477-030X
DOI
10.1177/0269216318801251
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
231b1635-5328-4064-b60d-1340e7a234fa
date added to LUP
2018-11-21 12:28:07
date last changed
2019-10-15 06:50:55
@article{231b1635-5328-4064-b60d-1340e7a234fa,
  abstract     = {<p>BACKGROUND:: There is a lack of knowledge about how the provision and availability of specialized palliative care relates to the quality of dying in hospital and community-based settings. AIM:: We aimed to explore the quality of care during last week of life in relation to different levels of palliative care development. DESIGN:: We investigated access to palliative care in Southern Sweden, where one region offers palliative care in accordance with European Association for Palliative Care guidelines for capacity, and the other region offers less developed palliative care. Data on approximately 12,000 deaths during 2015 were collected from the Swedish Register of Palliative Care. The quality of care was investigated by region, and was measured in terms of assessment of oral health and of pain, and end-of-life conversation, companionship at death and artificial nutrition/fluid in the last 24 h. RESULTS:: The overall quality of care during last week of life was not consistently better in the region with fully developed palliative care compared with the less developed region. In fact, for patients dying in hospitals and community-based settings, the quality was statistically significantly better in the less developed region. The small proportion of patients who had access to specialized palliative care had superior quality of care during the last week of life as compared to patients in other care settings. CONCLUSION:: The capacity of specialized palliative care does not per se influence the quality of care during the last week of life for patients in other settings.</p>},
  author       = {Schelin, Maria Ec and Sallerfors, Bengt and Rasmussen, Birgit H. and Fürst, Carl Johan},
  issn         = {1477-030X},
  keyword      = {Palliative care,population,quality of care},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {10},
  pages        = {1596--1604},
  publisher    = {SAGE Publications Inc.},
  series       = {Palliative Medicine},
  title        = {Quality of care for the dying across different levels of palliative care development : A population-based cohort study},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0269216318801251},
  volume       = {32},
  year         = {2018},
}