Advanced

Risk for incident and fatal prostate cancer in men with a family history of any incident and fatal cancer

Brandt, A.; Sundquist, Jan LU and Hemminki, Kari LU (2012) In Annals of Oncology 23(1). p.98-251
Abstract
Background: Familial clustering of incident prostate cancer and some cancers at other discordant sites has been reported. Less is known about familial clustering of fatal prostate cancer with any fatal discordant cancers. Estimates on familial aggregation based on mortality are free from bias of overdiagnosis. Patients and methods: We used the nationwide Swedish Family-Cancer Database to calculate standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) for incident prostate cancer for relatives of patients with any common cancer and standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) for death in prostate cancer for relatives of individuals who died from cancer. Similar risks were determined for any common cancer when relatives were affected by prostate cancer. Results: We... (More)
Background: Familial clustering of incident prostate cancer and some cancers at other discordant sites has been reported. Less is known about familial clustering of fatal prostate cancer with any fatal discordant cancers. Estimates on familial aggregation based on mortality are free from bias of overdiagnosis. Patients and methods: We used the nationwide Swedish Family-Cancer Database to calculate standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) for incident prostate cancer for relatives of patients with any common cancer and standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) for death in prostate cancer for relatives of individuals who died from cancer. Similar risks were determined for any common cancer when relatives were affected by prostate cancer. Results: We observed familial aggregation of incident and fatal prostate cancers. Familial clustering (SIRs increased) of prostate cancer and of cancers at discordant sites was found for breast, ovarian, and kidney cancers and melanoma. Also, fatal prostate cancer clustered with these and cervical cancers (SMRs increased). Conclusions: Our findings demonstrate that familial aggregation of prostate and breast cancers are not due to shared screening habits. The data on the association of cancers at discordant sites might be useful for clinical counseling and for mechanistic studies searching explanations to the familial clustering between discordant cancers. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
familial prostate cancer, fatal prostate cancer, population-based study, prostate
in
Annals of Oncology
volume
23
issue
1
pages
98 - 251
publisher
Oxford University Press
external identifiers
  • wos:000298385300037
  • scopus:84855179971
ISSN
1569-8041
DOI
10.1093/annonc/mdr056
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
bcd4bc0f-f954-49b1-987e-7028f9c13b9b (old id 2333935)
date added to LUP
2012-02-01 07:41:19
date last changed
2017-08-20 04:04:42
@article{bcd4bc0f-f954-49b1-987e-7028f9c13b9b,
  abstract     = {Background: Familial clustering of incident prostate cancer and some cancers at other discordant sites has been reported. Less is known about familial clustering of fatal prostate cancer with any fatal discordant cancers. Estimates on familial aggregation based on mortality are free from bias of overdiagnosis. Patients and methods: We used the nationwide Swedish Family-Cancer Database to calculate standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) for incident prostate cancer for relatives of patients with any common cancer and standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) for death in prostate cancer for relatives of individuals who died from cancer. Similar risks were determined for any common cancer when relatives were affected by prostate cancer. Results: We observed familial aggregation of incident and fatal prostate cancers. Familial clustering (SIRs increased) of prostate cancer and of cancers at discordant sites was found for breast, ovarian, and kidney cancers and melanoma. Also, fatal prostate cancer clustered with these and cervical cancers (SMRs increased). Conclusions: Our findings demonstrate that familial aggregation of prostate and breast cancers are not due to shared screening habits. The data on the association of cancers at discordant sites might be useful for clinical counseling and for mechanistic studies searching explanations to the familial clustering between discordant cancers.},
  author       = {Brandt, A. and Sundquist, Jan and Hemminki, Kari},
  issn         = {1569-8041},
  keyword      = {familial prostate cancer,fatal prostate cancer,population-based study,prostate},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {98--251},
  publisher    = {Oxford University Press},
  series       = {Annals of Oncology},
  title        = {Risk for incident and fatal prostate cancer in men with a family history of any incident and fatal cancer},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/annonc/mdr056},
  volume       = {23},
  year         = {2012},
}