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Extraction of Antioxidants from Spruce (Picea abies) Bark using Eco-friendly Solvents

Co, Michelle; Fagerlund, Amelie; Engman, Lars; Sunnerheim, Kerstin; Sjoberg, Per J. R. and Turner, Charlotta LU (2012) In Phytochemical Analysis 23(1). p.1-11
Abstract
Introduction - Antioxidants are known to avert oxidation processes and they are found in trees and other plant materials. Tree bark is a major waste product from paper pulp industries; hence it is worthwhile to develop an extraction technique to extract the antioxidants. Objective - To develop a fast and environmentally sustainable extraction technique for the extraction of antioxidants from bark of spruce (Picea abies) and also to identify the extracted antioxidants that are abundant in spruce bark. Methodology - A screening experiment that involved three different techniques was conducted to determine the best technique to extract antioxidants. The antioxidant capacity of the extracts was determined with DPPH... (More)
Introduction - Antioxidants are known to avert oxidation processes and they are found in trees and other plant materials. Tree bark is a major waste product from paper pulp industries; hence it is worthwhile to develop an extraction technique to extract the antioxidants. Objective - To develop a fast and environmentally sustainable extraction technique for the extraction of antioxidants from bark of spruce (Picea abies) and also to identify the extracted antioxidants that are abundant in spruce bark. Methodology - A screening experiment that involved three different techniques was conducted to determine the best technique to extract antioxidants. The antioxidant capacity of the extracts was determined with DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl) assay. Pressurised fluid extraction (PFE) turned out to be the best technique and a response surface design was therefore utilised to optimise PFE. Furthermore, NMR and HPLC-DAD-MS/MS were applied to identify the extracted antioxidants. Results - PFE using water and ethanol as solvent at 160 and 180 degrees C, respectively, gave extracts of the highest antioxidant capacity. Stilbene glucosides such as isorhapontin, piceid and astringin were identified in the extracts. Conclusion - The study has shown that PFE is a fast and environmentally sustainable technique, using water and ethanol as solvent for the extraction of antioxidants from spruce bark. Copyright (C) 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
accelerated solvent extraction, antioxidant, DPPH, ethanol, Picea abies, pressurised fluid extraction, supercritical fluid extraction, water, stilbene glucosides
in
Phytochemical Analysis
volume
23
issue
1
pages
1 - 11
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • wos:000298260100001
  • scopus:82955198459
ISSN
1099-1565
DOI
10.1002/pca.1316
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
2dedae41-d30b-4983-99b7-b0b5ba43459d (old id 2333956)
date added to LUP
2012-01-30 14:40:23
date last changed
2017-09-17 03:32:40
@article{2dedae41-d30b-4983-99b7-b0b5ba43459d,
  abstract     = {Introduction - Antioxidants are known to avert oxidation processes and they are found in trees and other plant materials. Tree bark is a major waste product from paper pulp industries; hence it is worthwhile to develop an extraction technique to extract the antioxidants. Objective - To develop a fast and environmentally sustainable extraction technique for the extraction of antioxidants from bark of spruce (Picea abies) and also to identify the extracted antioxidants that are abundant in spruce bark. Methodology - A screening experiment that involved three different techniques was conducted to determine the best technique to extract antioxidants. The antioxidant capacity of the extracts was determined with DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl) assay. Pressurised fluid extraction (PFE) turned out to be the best technique and a response surface design was therefore utilised to optimise PFE. Furthermore, NMR and HPLC-DAD-MS/MS were applied to identify the extracted antioxidants. Results - PFE using water and ethanol as solvent at 160 and 180 degrees C, respectively, gave extracts of the highest antioxidant capacity. Stilbene glucosides such as isorhapontin, piceid and astringin were identified in the extracts. Conclusion - The study has shown that PFE is a fast and environmentally sustainable technique, using water and ethanol as solvent for the extraction of antioxidants from spruce bark. Copyright (C) 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.},
  author       = {Co, Michelle and Fagerlund, Amelie and Engman, Lars and Sunnerheim, Kerstin and Sjoberg, Per J. R. and Turner, Charlotta},
  issn         = {1099-1565},
  keyword      = {accelerated solvent extraction,antioxidant,DPPH,ethanol,Picea abies,pressurised fluid extraction,supercritical fluid extraction,water,stilbene glucosides},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {1--11},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Phytochemical Analysis},
  title        = {Extraction of Antioxidants from Spruce (Picea abies) Bark using Eco-friendly Solvents},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/pca.1316},
  volume       = {23},
  year         = {2012},
}