Advanced

Cognitive behavioural therapy in multiple sclerosis: A randomized controlled pilot study of acceptance and commitment therapy.

Nordin, Linda LU and Rorsman, Ia LU (2012) In Journal of rehabilitation medicine : official journal of the UEMS European Board of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine 44(1). p.87-90
Abstract
OBJECTIVE:

The aim of this study was to design a trial that could evaluate the effect of acceptance and commitment therapy as a group-intervention for multiple sclerosis patients with psychological distress.

DESIGN:

Randomized controlled trial with assessment at pretreatment, end of treatment, and at 3-month follow-up.

SUBJECTS:

Multiple sclerosis outpatients with elevated symptoms of anxiety and/or depression (n = 21).

METHODS:

Patients were randomly assigned to acceptance and commitment therapy or relaxation training. Both treatments consisted of 5 sessions over 15 weeks containing didactic sessions, group discussions, and exercises. Outcome was assessed by self-rated... (More)
OBJECTIVE:

The aim of this study was to design a trial that could evaluate the effect of acceptance and commitment therapy as a group-intervention for multiple sclerosis patients with psychological distress.

DESIGN:

Randomized controlled trial with assessment at pretreatment, end of treatment, and at 3-month follow-up.

SUBJECTS:

Multiple sclerosis outpatients with elevated symptoms of anxiety and/or depression (n = 21).

METHODS:

Patients were randomly assigned to acceptance and commitment therapy or relaxation training. Both treatments consisted of 5 sessions over 15 weeks containing didactic sessions, group discussions, and exercises. Outcome was assessed by self-rated symptoms of anxiety, depression, and a measure of acceptance.

RESULTS:

At 3-month follow-up, the relaxation training group had a significant decline in anxiety symptoms whereas the acceptance and commitment therapy group showed a maintained improvement in rated acceptance at follow-up.

CONCLUSION:

The results reflect the different emphases of the therapies. Acceptance and commitment therapy is aimed at living an active, valued life and increasing acceptance, while relaxation training focuses directly on coping strategies to handle emotional symptoms. The results are preliminary, but supportive of further study of brief group interventions for reducing psychological distress in patients with multiple sclerosis. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
psychotherapy, group., relaxation therapy, cognitive behaviour therapy, Multiple sclerosis
in
Journal of rehabilitation medicine : official journal of the UEMS European Board of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine
volume
44
issue
1
pages
87 - 90
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • wos:000300263900015
  • pmid:22234322
  • scopus:84855906036
ISSN
1651-2081
DOI
10.2340/16501977-0898
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
9accc230-037b-4335-acd9-c8f411c67ad5 (old id 2336582)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22234322?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2012-02-01 20:14:52
date last changed
2017-10-01 04:09:08
@article{9accc230-037b-4335-acd9-c8f411c67ad5,
  abstract     = {OBJECTIVE:<br/><br>
The aim of this study was to design a trial that could evaluate the effect of acceptance and commitment therapy as a group-intervention for multiple sclerosis patients with psychological distress.<br/><br>
DESIGN:<br/><br>
Randomized controlled trial with assessment at pretreatment, end of treatment, and at 3-month follow-up.<br/><br>
SUBJECTS:<br/><br>
Multiple sclerosis outpatients with elevated symptoms of anxiety and/or depression (n = 21).<br/><br>
METHODS:<br/><br>
Patients were randomly assigned to acceptance and commitment therapy or relaxation training. Both treatments consisted of 5 sessions over 15 weeks containing didactic sessions, group discussions, and exercises. Outcome was assessed by self-rated symptoms of anxiety, depression, and a measure of acceptance.<br/><br>
RESULTS:<br/><br>
At 3-month follow-up, the relaxation training group had a significant decline in anxiety symptoms whereas the acceptance and commitment therapy group showed a maintained improvement in rated acceptance at follow-up.<br/><br>
CONCLUSION:<br/><br>
The results reflect the different emphases of the therapies. Acceptance and commitment therapy is aimed at living an active, valued life and increasing acceptance, while relaxation training focuses directly on coping strategies to handle emotional symptoms. The results are preliminary, but supportive of further study of brief group interventions for reducing psychological distress in patients with multiple sclerosis.},
  author       = {Nordin, Linda and Rorsman, Ia},
  issn         = {1651-2081},
  keyword      = {psychotherapy,group.,relaxation therapy,cognitive behaviour therapy,Multiple sclerosis},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {87--90},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Journal of rehabilitation medicine : official journal of the UEMS European Board of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine},
  title        = {Cognitive behavioural therapy in multiple sclerosis: A randomized controlled pilot study of acceptance and commitment therapy.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.2340/16501977-0898},
  volume       = {44},
  year         = {2012},
}