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Low back pain - epidemiology of consultations.

Jöud, Anna LU ; Petersson, Ingemar LU and Englund, Martin LU (2012) In Arthritis Care and Research1988-01-01+01:002000-01-01+01:00 64(7). p.1084-1088
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: Low back pain (LBP) affects most people at some stage in life. However, the burden on the health care system is unclear. We studied: 1) the one-year consultation prevalence 2) the rate of first-time consultation for LBP and related the frequency to other musculoskeletal conditions and 3) the health care utilization of LBP patients compared to the general population.



METHODS: Using the health care register in southern Sweden (population 1.2 million), including diagnoses (ICD-10) by physicians, we identified all who in 2009 were diagnosed with LBP defined as lumbago with sciatica, low back pain, or other/unspecified dorsalgia. We defined first-time consultation as a consultation in 2009 without a record of a... (More)
OBJECTIVES: Low back pain (LBP) affects most people at some stage in life. However, the burden on the health care system is unclear. We studied: 1) the one-year consultation prevalence 2) the rate of first-time consultation for LBP and related the frequency to other musculoskeletal conditions and 3) the health care utilization of LBP patients compared to the general population.



METHODS: Using the health care register in southern Sweden (population 1.2 million), including diagnoses (ICD-10) by physicians, we identified all who in 2009 were diagnosed with LBP defined as lumbago with sciatica, low back pain, or other/unspecified dorsalgia. We defined first-time consultation as a consultation in 2009 without a record of a LBP diagnosis 2004-2008. Standardized health care utilization ratios were calculated for LBP patients compared to the general population seeking care.



RESULTS: The one-year consultation prevalence of LBP in the population was 3.8% (women=4.3%, men=3.3%) and increased with age. LBP had been recorded in 17.1% of all patients (women=16.5%, men=18.0%) who had been diagnosed with any musculoskeletal condition. The rate of first-time consultation was 238 per 10,000 adults (women=265, men=209). The health care utilization ratio in female and male patients with LBP was 1.74 (95% CI 1.73-1.75) and 1.81 (95% CI 1.80-1.82) respectively.



CONCLUSION: LBP, diagnosed in every 6(th) patient who consulted due to a musculoskeletal problem, is a public health concern that needs structured management. LBP patients consume close to twice as much health care as the general population and this warrants more awareness. © 2012 by the American College of Rheumatology. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Arthritis Care and Research1988-01-01+01:002000-01-01+01:00
volume
64
issue
7
pages
1084 - 1088
publisher
John Wiley & Sons
external identifiers
  • wos:000305741000018
  • pmid:22337573
  • scopus:84863478238
ISSN
2151-4658
DOI
10.1002/acr.21642
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
1824f24d-b3ec-4b06-a87d-b941fa8d9cd2 (old id 2366850)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22337573?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2012-03-02 12:02:36
date last changed
2017-08-13 03:12:13
@article{1824f24d-b3ec-4b06-a87d-b941fa8d9cd2,
  abstract     = {OBJECTIVES: Low back pain (LBP) affects most people at some stage in life. However, the burden on the health care system is unclear. We studied: 1) the one-year consultation prevalence 2) the rate of first-time consultation for LBP and related the frequency to other musculoskeletal conditions and 3) the health care utilization of LBP patients compared to the general population. <br/><br>
<br/><br>
METHODS: Using the health care register in southern Sweden (population 1.2 million), including diagnoses (ICD-10) by physicians, we identified all who in 2009 were diagnosed with LBP defined as lumbago with sciatica, low back pain, or other/unspecified dorsalgia. We defined first-time consultation as a consultation in 2009 without a record of a LBP diagnosis 2004-2008. Standardized health care utilization ratios were calculated for LBP patients compared to the general population seeking care. <br/><br>
<br/><br>
RESULTS: The one-year consultation prevalence of LBP in the population was 3.8% (women=4.3%, men=3.3%) and increased with age. LBP had been recorded in 17.1% of all patients (women=16.5%, men=18.0%) who had been diagnosed with any musculoskeletal condition. The rate of first-time consultation was 238 per 10,000 adults (women=265, men=209). The health care utilization ratio in female and male patients with LBP was 1.74 (95% CI 1.73-1.75) and 1.81 (95% CI 1.80-1.82) respectively. <br/><br>
<br/><br>
CONCLUSION: LBP, diagnosed in every 6(th) patient who consulted due to a musculoskeletal problem, is a public health concern that needs structured management. LBP patients consume close to twice as much health care as the general population and this warrants more awareness. © 2012 by the American College of Rheumatology.},
  author       = {Jöud, Anna and Petersson, Ingemar and Englund, Martin},
  issn         = {2151-4658},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {7},
  pages        = {1084--1088},
  publisher    = {John Wiley & Sons},
  series       = {Arthritis Care and Research1988-01-01+01:002000-01-01+01:00},
  title        = {Low back pain - epidemiology of consultations.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/acr.21642},
  volume       = {64},
  year         = {2012},
}