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Quinoa starch granules: a candidate for stabilising food-grade Pickering emulsions.

Rayner, Marilyn LU ; Timgren, Anna LU ; Sjöö, Malin LU and Dejmek, Petr LU (2012) In Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture 92(9). p.1841-1847
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Particle-stabilised emulsions, so-called Pickering emulsions, are known to possess many beneficial properties, including being extremely stable. Starch granules isolated from quinoa have been used as emulsion stabilising particles. The granules were intact, 1-3 µm in diameter and modified with octenyl succinic anhydride to increase their hydrophobicity. Starch granules, as opposed to most other particles used to generate Pickering emulsions, are edible, abundant and derived from natural sources. RESULTS: Emulsions produced by high shear homogenisation had droplet sizes of 9-70 µm depending on the starch-to-oil ratio. Droplet size decreased with increasing starch-to-oil ratio, but was unaffected by the oil phase volume over a... (More)
BACKGROUND: Particle-stabilised emulsions, so-called Pickering emulsions, are known to possess many beneficial properties, including being extremely stable. Starch granules isolated from quinoa have been used as emulsion stabilising particles. The granules were intact, 1-3 µm in diameter and modified with octenyl succinic anhydride to increase their hydrophobicity. Starch granules, as opposed to most other particles used to generate Pickering emulsions, are edible, abundant and derived from natural sources. RESULTS: Emulsions produced by high shear homogenisation had droplet sizes of 9-70 µm depending on the starch-to-oil ratio. Droplet size decreased with increasing starch-to-oil ratio, but was unaffected by the oil phase volume over a range of 5-33% oil (v/v). Although the drops were large and subject to creaming, their size remained unchanged over a period of 7 days. By adjusting the starch-to-oil ratio drops could be made to be buoyancy neutral to prevent creaming. Rheological characterisation indicated a gel structure with an elastic modulus in the range 200-2000 Pa depending on droplet size. CONCLUSION: This work has demonstrated the successful use of starch granules to stabilise emulsions which may find applications beyond that of food, for example in cosmetics and pharmaceutical formulations. Copyright © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture
volume
92
issue
9
pages
1841 - 1847
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • wos:000304866900005
  • pmid:22318925
  • scopus:84861992789
ISSN
1097-0010
DOI
10.1002/jsfa.5610
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
953009f5-0eec-42c1-a330-630808dc4a1a (old id 2367137)
date added to LUP
2012-03-06 17:10:12
date last changed
2017-10-08 04:06:58
@article{953009f5-0eec-42c1-a330-630808dc4a1a,
  abstract     = {BACKGROUND: Particle-stabilised emulsions, so-called Pickering emulsions, are known to possess many beneficial properties, including being extremely stable. Starch granules isolated from quinoa have been used as emulsion stabilising particles. The granules were intact, 1-3 µm in diameter and modified with octenyl succinic anhydride to increase their hydrophobicity. Starch granules, as opposed to most other particles used to generate Pickering emulsions, are edible, abundant and derived from natural sources. RESULTS: Emulsions produced by high shear homogenisation had droplet sizes of 9-70 µm depending on the starch-to-oil ratio. Droplet size decreased with increasing starch-to-oil ratio, but was unaffected by the oil phase volume over a range of 5-33% oil (v/v). Although the drops were large and subject to creaming, their size remained unchanged over a period of 7 days. By adjusting the starch-to-oil ratio drops could be made to be buoyancy neutral to prevent creaming. Rheological characterisation indicated a gel structure with an elastic modulus in the range 200-2000 Pa depending on droplet size. CONCLUSION: This work has demonstrated the successful use of starch granules to stabilise emulsions which may find applications beyond that of food, for example in cosmetics and pharmaceutical formulations. Copyright © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.},
  author       = {Rayner, Marilyn and Timgren, Anna and Sjöö, Malin and Dejmek, Petr},
  issn         = {1097-0010},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {9},
  pages        = {1841--1847},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture},
  title        = {Quinoa starch granules: a candidate for stabilising food-grade Pickering emulsions.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jsfa.5610},
  volume       = {92},
  year         = {2012},
}