Skip to main content

Lund University Publications

LUND UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES

Quantifying rates of HIV-1 flow between risk groups and geographic locations in Kenya : A country-wide phylogenetic study

Nduva, George M. LU ; Otieno, Frederick ; Kimani, Joshua ; Wahome, Elizabeth ; McKinnon, Lyle R. ; Cholette, Francois ; Majiwa, Maxwell ; Masika, Moses ; Mutua, Gaudensia and Anzala, Omu , et al. (2022) In Virus Evolution 8(1).
Abstract

In Kenya, HIV-1 key populations including men having sex with men (MSM), people who inject drugs (PWID) and female sex workers (FSW) are thought to significantly contribute to HIV-1 transmission in the wider, mostly heterosexual (HET) HIV-1 transmission network. However, clear data on HIV-1 transmission dynamics within and between these groups are limited. We aimed to empirically quantify rates of HIV-1 flow between key populations and the HET population, as well as between different geographic regions to determine HIV-1 'hotspots' and their contribution to HIV-1 transmission in Kenya. We used maximum-likelihood phylogenetic and Bayesian inference to analyse 4058 HIV-1 pol sequences (representing 0.3 per cent of the epidemic in Kenya)... (More)

In Kenya, HIV-1 key populations including men having sex with men (MSM), people who inject drugs (PWID) and female sex workers (FSW) are thought to significantly contribute to HIV-1 transmission in the wider, mostly heterosexual (HET) HIV-1 transmission network. However, clear data on HIV-1 transmission dynamics within and between these groups are limited. We aimed to empirically quantify rates of HIV-1 flow between key populations and the HET population, as well as between different geographic regions to determine HIV-1 'hotspots' and their contribution to HIV-1 transmission in Kenya. We used maximum-likelihood phylogenetic and Bayesian inference to analyse 4058 HIV-1 pol sequences (representing 0.3 per cent of the epidemic in Kenya) sampled 1986-2019 from individuals of different risk groups and regions in Kenya. We found 89 per cent within-risk group transmission and 11 per cent mixing between risk groups, cyclic HIV-1 exchange between adjoining geographic provinces and strong evidence of HIV-1 dissemination from (i) West-to-East (i.e. higher-to-lower HIV-1 prevalence regions), and (ii) heterosexual-to-key populations. Low HIV-1 prevalence regions and key populations are sinks rather than major sources of HIV-1 transmission in Kenya. Targeting key populations in Kenya needs to occur concurrently with strengthening interventions in the general epidemic.

(Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; and , et al. (More)
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; and (Less)
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
HIV-1, key populations, molecular epidemiology, transmission
in
Virus Evolution
volume
8
issue
1
article number
veac016
publisher
Oxford University Press
external identifiers
  • scopus:85128223907
  • pmid:35356640
ISSN
2057-1577
DOI
10.1093/ve/veac016
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
241af742-03ae-4ae6-b984-a0316603cafe
date added to LUP
2022-07-06 14:48:10
date last changed
2022-09-24 23:50:34
@article{241af742-03ae-4ae6-b984-a0316603cafe,
  abstract     = {{<p>In Kenya, HIV-1 key populations including men having sex with men (MSM), people who inject drugs (PWID) and female sex workers (FSW) are thought to significantly contribute to HIV-1 transmission in the wider, mostly heterosexual (HET) HIV-1 transmission network. However, clear data on HIV-1 transmission dynamics within and between these groups are limited. We aimed to empirically quantify rates of HIV-1 flow between key populations and the HET population, as well as between different geographic regions to determine HIV-1 'hotspots' and their contribution to HIV-1 transmission in Kenya. We used maximum-likelihood phylogenetic and Bayesian inference to analyse 4058 HIV-1 pol sequences (representing 0.3 per cent of the epidemic in Kenya) sampled 1986-2019 from individuals of different risk groups and regions in Kenya. We found 89 per cent within-risk group transmission and 11 per cent mixing between risk groups, cyclic HIV-1 exchange between adjoining geographic provinces and strong evidence of HIV-1 dissemination from (i) West-to-East (i.e. higher-to-lower HIV-1 prevalence regions), and (ii) heterosexual-to-key populations. Low HIV-1 prevalence regions and key populations are sinks rather than major sources of HIV-1 transmission in Kenya. Targeting key populations in Kenya needs to occur concurrently with strengthening interventions in the general epidemic. </p>}},
  author       = {{Nduva, George M. and Otieno, Frederick and Kimani, Joshua and Wahome, Elizabeth and McKinnon, Lyle R. and Cholette, Francois and Majiwa, Maxwell and Masika, Moses and Mutua, Gaudensia and Anzala, Omu and Graham, Susan M. and Gelmon, Larry and Price, Matt A. and Smith, Adrian D. and Bailey, Robert C. and Baele, Guy and Lemey, Philippe and Hassan, Amin S. and Sanders, Eduard J. and Esbjörnsson, Joakim}},
  issn         = {{2057-1577}},
  keywords     = {{HIV-1; key populations; molecular epidemiology; transmission}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  number       = {{1}},
  publisher    = {{Oxford University Press}},
  series       = {{Virus Evolution}},
  title        = {{Quantifying rates of HIV-1 flow between risk groups and geographic locations in Kenya : A country-wide phylogenetic study}},
  url          = {{http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ve/veac016}},
  doi          = {{10.1093/ve/veac016}},
  volume       = {{8}},
  year         = {{2022}},
}