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Lactobacillus plantarum 299v Does Not Reduce Enteric Bacteria or Bacterial Translocation in Patients Undergoing Colon Resection.

Mangell, Peter LU ; Thorlacius, Henrik LU ; Syk, Ingvar LU ; Ahrné, Siv; Molin, Göran; Olsson, Crister LU and Jeppsson, Bengt LU (2012) In Digestive Diseases and Sciences 57(7). p.1915-1924
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Probiotics may exert beneficial effects in the gastrointestinal tract. This randomized trial investigated the effect of the probiotic Lactobacillus plantarum 299v on the intestinal load of potentially pathogenic bacteria, bacterial translocation, and cell proliferation in elective colon surgery.



METHODS: Seventy-five patients were randomized to pre- and postoperative oral intake of Lactobacillus plantarum 299v or placebo. Rectal swabs and mucosal biopsies were taken before the start of intake, after 1 week, at surgery, and after 6 days, weeks, and months. Viable counts were quantified for clostridia, Enterobacteriaceae, Gram-negative anaerobes, and lactobacilli. Bacterial translocation was determined by the... (More)
BACKGROUND: Probiotics may exert beneficial effects in the gastrointestinal tract. This randomized trial investigated the effect of the probiotic Lactobacillus plantarum 299v on the intestinal load of potentially pathogenic bacteria, bacterial translocation, and cell proliferation in elective colon surgery.



METHODS: Seventy-five patients were randomized to pre- and postoperative oral intake of Lactobacillus plantarum 299v or placebo. Rectal swabs and mucosal biopsies were taken before the start of intake, after 1 week, at surgery, and after 6 days, weeks, and months. Viable counts were quantified for clostridia, Enterobacteriaceae, Gram-negative anaerobes, and lactobacilli. Bacterial translocation was determined by the analysis of bacterial DNA genes in mesenteric lymph nodes. Ki-67 was used as a marker of cell proliferation in normal mucosa and tumor.



RESULTS: Lactobacillus plantarum 299v was given without adverse effects. Lactobacillus plantarum 299v as well as Enterobacteriaceae and Gram-negative anaerobes increased in the colon 1 week after the administration of Lactobacillus plantarum 299v. There were no significant differences between patients receiving Lactobacillus plantarum 299v and placebo in the incidence of bacterial translocation (27 vs. 13 %) and postoperative complications (16 vs. 31 %).



CONCLUSIONS: Lactobacillus plantarum 299v was established in the intestine, but no inhibitory effect on enteric bacteria, bacterial translocation, or postoperative complications was found. The mechanism behind the protective effects of probiotics found in animal and some human studies remain elusive and require further explorations. No adverse effects were recorded after the administration of high doses of Lactobacillus plantarum 299v. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Digestive Diseases and Sciences
volume
57
issue
7
pages
1915 - 1924
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • wos:000305746100025
  • pmid:22434095
  • scopus:84864288398
ISSN
1573-2568
DOI
10.1007/s10620-012-2102-y
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
00f5ae06-fd59-4a53-92f3-58de7312a3e1 (old id 2431600)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22434095?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2012-04-03 12:25:47
date last changed
2017-10-22 04:53:28
@article{00f5ae06-fd59-4a53-92f3-58de7312a3e1,
  abstract     = {BACKGROUND: Probiotics may exert beneficial effects in the gastrointestinal tract. This randomized trial investigated the effect of the probiotic Lactobacillus plantarum 299v on the intestinal load of potentially pathogenic bacteria, bacterial translocation, and cell proliferation in elective colon surgery. <br/><br>
<br/><br>
METHODS: Seventy-five patients were randomized to pre- and postoperative oral intake of Lactobacillus plantarum 299v or placebo. Rectal swabs and mucosal biopsies were taken before the start of intake, after 1 week, at surgery, and after 6 days, weeks, and months. Viable counts were quantified for clostridia, Enterobacteriaceae, Gram-negative anaerobes, and lactobacilli. Bacterial translocation was determined by the analysis of bacterial DNA genes in mesenteric lymph nodes. Ki-67 was used as a marker of cell proliferation in normal mucosa and tumor. <br/><br>
<br/><br>
RESULTS: Lactobacillus plantarum 299v was given without adverse effects. Lactobacillus plantarum 299v as well as Enterobacteriaceae and Gram-negative anaerobes increased in the colon 1 week after the administration of Lactobacillus plantarum 299v. There were no significant differences between patients receiving Lactobacillus plantarum 299v and placebo in the incidence of bacterial translocation (27 vs. 13 %) and postoperative complications (16 vs. 31 %). <br/><br>
<br/><br>
CONCLUSIONS: Lactobacillus plantarum 299v was established in the intestine, but no inhibitory effect on enteric bacteria, bacterial translocation, or postoperative complications was found. The mechanism behind the protective effects of probiotics found in animal and some human studies remain elusive and require further explorations. No adverse effects were recorded after the administration of high doses of Lactobacillus plantarum 299v.},
  author       = {Mangell, Peter and Thorlacius, Henrik and Syk, Ingvar and Ahrné, Siv and Molin, Göran and Olsson, Crister and Jeppsson, Bengt},
  issn         = {1573-2568},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {7},
  pages        = {1915--1924},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {Digestive Diseases and Sciences},
  title        = {Lactobacillus plantarum 299v Does Not Reduce Enteric Bacteria or Bacterial Translocation in Patients Undergoing Colon Resection.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10620-012-2102-y},
  volume       = {57},
  year         = {2012},
}