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Incidence of cancer of unknown primary in Sweden: analysis by location of metastasis.

Bevier, Melanie LU ; Sundquist, Jan LU and Hemminki, Kari LU (2012) In European Journal of Cancer Prevention 21(6). p.596-601
Abstract
Increasing incidences of cancer of unknown primary (CUP) have been observed in Sweden previously. However, it is not known how the incidence trends for specific locations of metastasis vary. Site-specific data are available on the basis of the ninth international classification of diseases. CUP patients were identified between 1987 and 2008 from the Swedish Family-Cancer Database. Malignant neoplasms of ill-defined sites were diagnosed in 4042 patients, 1976 developed metastasis in lymph nodes, 9615 had metastasis in specified organs, and in 8052 patients, the malignant neoplasm was diagnosed without further specification. Age-standardized incidence rates for 23 685 patients were analyzed using a direct method of standardization. Overall,... (More)
Increasing incidences of cancer of unknown primary (CUP) have been observed in Sweden previously. However, it is not known how the incidence trends for specific locations of metastasis vary. Site-specific data are available on the basis of the ninth international classification of diseases. CUP patients were identified between 1987 and 2008 from the Swedish Family-Cancer Database. Malignant neoplasms of ill-defined sites were diagnosed in 4042 patients, 1976 developed metastasis in lymph nodes, 9615 had metastasis in specified organs, and in 8052 patients, the malignant neoplasm was diagnosed without further specification. Age-standardized incidence rates for 23 685 patients were analyzed using a direct method of standardization. Overall, the incidence of CUP decreased from 6.98 to 6.00 per 100 000 from 1987 to 2008. The number of patients diagnosed with metastasis in specified organs decreased, whereas the number of patients diagnosed with CUP without further specification increased from 2.65 to 3.02 per 100 000. With improvements in diagnostic methods and imaging techniques for identification of cancer, the incidences of CUP have been decreasing because primary tumors can be specified more often. Computed tomography is typically sensitive in detecting lung, kidney, and colorectal cancers, which are known to have a genetic link with CUP. Prostate-specific antigen testing is used to detect prostate cancer, for which bone is a common metastatic site. Liver metastases are common if the primary tumor is located in the colorectum. If the primary tumor is found, this cancer site replaces the diagnosis of CUP within the Cancer Register and therefore CUP incidence is decreased. (Less)
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author
organization
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type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
European Journal of Cancer Prevention
volume
21
issue
6
pages
596 - 601
publisher
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
external identifiers
  • wos:000309543000015
  • pmid:22387673
  • scopus:84866976266
ISSN
1473-5709
DOI
10.1097/CEJ.0b013e3283523468
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
617720ba-c56a-4ce9-962f-f9c0c8f0d501 (old id 2432273)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22387673?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2012-04-03 08:23:56
date last changed
2017-11-05 04:44:52
@article{617720ba-c56a-4ce9-962f-f9c0c8f0d501,
  abstract     = {Increasing incidences of cancer of unknown primary (CUP) have been observed in Sweden previously. However, it is not known how the incidence trends for specific locations of metastasis vary. Site-specific data are available on the basis of the ninth international classification of diseases. CUP patients were identified between 1987 and 2008 from the Swedish Family-Cancer Database. Malignant neoplasms of ill-defined sites were diagnosed in 4042 patients, 1976 developed metastasis in lymph nodes, 9615 had metastasis in specified organs, and in 8052 patients, the malignant neoplasm was diagnosed without further specification. Age-standardized incidence rates for 23 685 patients were analyzed using a direct method of standardization. Overall, the incidence of CUP decreased from 6.98 to 6.00 per 100 000 from 1987 to 2008. The number of patients diagnosed with metastasis in specified organs decreased, whereas the number of patients diagnosed with CUP without further specification increased from 2.65 to 3.02 per 100 000. With improvements in diagnostic methods and imaging techniques for identification of cancer, the incidences of CUP have been decreasing because primary tumors can be specified more often. Computed tomography is typically sensitive in detecting lung, kidney, and colorectal cancers, which are known to have a genetic link with CUP. Prostate-specific antigen testing is used to detect prostate cancer, for which bone is a common metastatic site. Liver metastases are common if the primary tumor is located in the colorectum. If the primary tumor is found, this cancer site replaces the diagnosis of CUP within the Cancer Register and therefore CUP incidence is decreased.},
  author       = {Bevier, Melanie and Sundquist, Jan and Hemminki, Kari},
  issn         = {1473-5709},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {596--601},
  publisher    = {Lippincott Williams & Wilkins},
  series       = {European Journal of Cancer Prevention},
  title        = {Incidence of cancer of unknown primary in Sweden: analysis by location of metastasis.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CEJ.0b013e3283523468},
  volume       = {21},
  year         = {2012},
}