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Effect of button location on driver's visual behaviour and safety perception

Dukic, T; Hanson, Lars LU ; Holmqvist, Kenneth LU and Wartenberg, Constanze LU (2005) In Ergonomics 48(4). p.399-410
Abstract
Although buttons are a frequently used type of control in car interiors, little research has been undertaken on how the usage of buttons affects the visual behaviour of the driver. In this study, the aim was to analyse the effect of push button location and auditory feedback on drivers' visual time off road and safety perception when driving in a real traffic situation. The effect of six button locations (five on the centre stack, one near the gear stick) was tested. Drivers' visual behaviour was studied in real traffic on a motorway. An eye tracking system recorded the visual behaviour of eight drivers who, in 96 repeated trials each, were instructed to press a specific button. Data analysis focused on the drivers' visual time off road... (More)
Although buttons are a frequently used type of control in car interiors, little research has been undertaken on how the usage of buttons affects the visual behaviour of the driver. In this study, the aim was to analyse the effect of push button location and auditory feedback on drivers' visual time off road and safety perception when driving in a real traffic situation. The effect of six button locations (five on the centre stack, one near the gear stick) was tested. Drivers' visual behaviour was studied in real traffic on a motorway. An eye tracking system recorded the visual behaviour of eight drivers who, in 96 repeated trials each, were instructed to press a specific button. Data analysis focused on the drivers' visual time off road and safety perception in relation to the location of the button to be pressed. Auditory feedback did not show a significant effect on visual time off road. The time off road increased significantly as the angle increased between the normal line of sight and button location for the five buttons placed on the centre stack. Results for the button located close to the gear stick, with the highest eccentricity, produced a short time off road. This unexpected finding is discussed in terms of three potential explanations: 1) the role of perceptual discrimination; 2) risk perception; and 3) motor control. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
vehicle interior, steering-wheel deviation, safety perception, button location, driver eye movements, visual time off road
in
Ergonomics
volume
48
issue
4
pages
399 - 410
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • wos:000227986600005
  • pmid:15804848
  • scopus:17244362246
ISSN
0014-0139
DOI
10.1080/00140130400029092
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
2ea8be79-7f36-4a6a-b19b-3f427018e5aa (old id 247137)
date added to LUP
2007-08-10 11:43:03
date last changed
2017-10-22 03:42:50
@article{2ea8be79-7f36-4a6a-b19b-3f427018e5aa,
  abstract     = {Although buttons are a frequently used type of control in car interiors, little research has been undertaken on how the usage of buttons affects the visual behaviour of the driver. In this study, the aim was to analyse the effect of push button location and auditory feedback on drivers' visual time off road and safety perception when driving in a real traffic situation. The effect of six button locations (five on the centre stack, one near the gear stick) was tested. Drivers' visual behaviour was studied in real traffic on a motorway. An eye tracking system recorded the visual behaviour of eight drivers who, in 96 repeated trials each, were instructed to press a specific button. Data analysis focused on the drivers' visual time off road and safety perception in relation to the location of the button to be pressed. Auditory feedback did not show a significant effect on visual time off road. The time off road increased significantly as the angle increased between the normal line of sight and button location for the five buttons placed on the centre stack. Results for the button located close to the gear stick, with the highest eccentricity, produced a short time off road. This unexpected finding is discussed in terms of three potential explanations: 1) the role of perceptual discrimination; 2) risk perception; and 3) motor control.},
  author       = {Dukic, T and Hanson, Lars and Holmqvist, Kenneth and Wartenberg, Constanze},
  issn         = {0014-0139},
  keyword      = {vehicle interior,steering-wheel deviation,safety perception,button location,driver eye movements,visual time off road},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {399--410},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Ergonomics},
  title        = {Effect of button location on driver's visual behaviour and safety perception},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00140130400029092},
  volume       = {48},
  year         = {2005},
}