Advanced

Lung edema formation during cold perfusion: Important differences between rat and porcine lung

Wierup, P; Liao, Qiuming LU ; Bolys, R; Sjöberg, Trygve LU ; Rippe, Bengt LU and Steen, Stig LU (2005) In The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation 24(4). p.379-385
Abstract
Background: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of different perfusion pressures on edema formation during cold flush perfusion with the 2 most commonly used preservation solutions in clinical lung transplantation: Euro-Collins and Perfadex solutions. Methods: Isolated rat and porcine lungs were perfused for 3 minutes at 4 degrees C to 8 degrees C at a pressure of either 10, 15 or 20 mm, Hg. Weight gain was recorded continuously. Weight gain per minute was calculated after the first phase of rapid weight gain was completed. Results: In the rat model, perfusion pressure of 10 mm Hg resulted in a macro- and microscopically apparent edema, irrespective of the type of preservation solution. Perfusion pressures of 10, 15 and 20... (More)
Background: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of different perfusion pressures on edema formation during cold flush perfusion with the 2 most commonly used preservation solutions in clinical lung transplantation: Euro-Collins and Perfadex solutions. Methods: Isolated rat and porcine lungs were perfused for 3 minutes at 4 degrees C to 8 degrees C at a pressure of either 10, 15 or 20 mm, Hg. Weight gain was recorded continuously. Weight gain per minute was calculated after the first phase of rapid weight gain was completed. Results: In the rat model, perfusion pressure of 10 mm Hg resulted in a macro- and microscopically apparent edema, irrespective of the type of preservation solution. Perfusion pressures of 10, 15 and 20 nun Hg gave weight gains of 100%, 150% and 350%, respectively, after 3 minutes of perfusion. The corresponding weight gain per minute was 18%, 31% and 84% of the initial weight. There were no statistically significant differences in weight gain between the different solutions at equal perfusion pressure. In the porcine model the flow was extremely low at 10 mm Hg and no weight gain was registered, whereas the weight gain per minute at 15 and 20 mm Hg was 1.0% and 2.1% of the initial weight. Conclusions: In porcine lungs, cold perfusion at 20 mm Hg gives minimal edema formation, whereas in rat lungs the edema formation is deleterious, irrespective of the solution used. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation
volume
24
issue
4
pages
379 - 385
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000227922400003
  • pmid:15812908
  • scopus:15544369498
ISSN
1557-3117
DOI
10.1016/j.healun.2004.03.024
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
f41afde8-f844-4bdf-b3a8-69faaa3da4f7 (old id 247954)
date added to LUP
2007-08-16 17:00:21
date last changed
2017-01-01 05:01:36
@article{f41afde8-f844-4bdf-b3a8-69faaa3da4f7,
  abstract     = {Background: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of different perfusion pressures on edema formation during cold flush perfusion with the 2 most commonly used preservation solutions in clinical lung transplantation: Euro-Collins and Perfadex solutions. Methods: Isolated rat and porcine lungs were perfused for 3 minutes at 4 degrees C to 8 degrees C at a pressure of either 10, 15 or 20 mm, Hg. Weight gain was recorded continuously. Weight gain per minute was calculated after the first phase of rapid weight gain was completed. Results: In the rat model, perfusion pressure of 10 mm Hg resulted in a macro- and microscopically apparent edema, irrespective of the type of preservation solution. Perfusion pressures of 10, 15 and 20 nun Hg gave weight gains of 100%, 150% and 350%, respectively, after 3 minutes of perfusion. The corresponding weight gain per minute was 18%, 31% and 84% of the initial weight. There were no statistically significant differences in weight gain between the different solutions at equal perfusion pressure. In the porcine model the flow was extremely low at 10 mm Hg and no weight gain was registered, whereas the weight gain per minute at 15 and 20 mm Hg was 1.0% and 2.1% of the initial weight. Conclusions: In porcine lungs, cold perfusion at 20 mm Hg gives minimal edema formation, whereas in rat lungs the edema formation is deleterious, irrespective of the solution used.},
  author       = {Wierup, P and Liao, Qiuming and Bolys, R and Sjöberg, Trygve and Rippe, Bengt and Steen, Stig},
  issn         = {1557-3117},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {379--385},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation},
  title        = {Lung edema formation during cold perfusion: Important differences between rat and porcine lung},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.healun.2004.03.024},
  volume       = {24},
  year         = {2005},
}